DF Mavens Ice Cream Review & GIVEAWAY!

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

Another week, another giveaway – the fourth of the summer here on Farmers Market Vegan, to be precise. This one comes at the prompting of my Coconut Bliss giveaway back in June, in which I relayed to you all the inner turmoil I experienced in deciding whether or not to run the giveaway after a representative contacted me. If you remember, soon after agreeing to host the giveaway, I discovered that in 2011 Coconut Bliss became majority owned by Lochmead Dairy, and thus that by following through with my agreement I would essentially be providing publicity for a dairy company by extension.

Obviously, I did end up running the Coconut Bliss giveaway, concluding that the imperfect state of the world renders “pure” veganism impossible and that the giveaway would provide an ideal opportunity to contact Lochmead and encourage them to expand their non-dairy options. But I still felt a bit of discomfort in devoting a blog post and giveaway to an ultimately non-vegan company – no matter how impressive their non-dairy ice creams and otherwise ethical practices – especially considering the existence of quality vegan ice cream purveyors that don’t engage with animal agriculture (or, at least not as directly. Again, imperfect world, people).

Photo via DF Mavens.

Photo via DF Mavens.

So I contacted one of those purveyors: the NYC-based DF Mavens (the “DF” standing for dairy-free, of course!). After explaining my desire to highlight a less questionable brand of ice cream, the folks at DF Mavens responded with enthusiasm, explaining their devotion to supporting the animal rights movement and vegan community. Indeed, a portion of all of DF Mavens’ profits goes to the national animal advocacy organization Mercy for Animals, while the company’s Board of Advisors includes such passionate and well-known animal/vegan advocates as Victoria Moran, Joshua Katcher, and Rich Roll. Though headed by one of the premier (non-vegan) ice cream consultants, DF Mavens functions independently of any dairy operation and is strongly backed by the decidedly vegan managing and marketing firm known as PlantBased Solutions.

Photo via DF Mavens.

Photo via DF Mavens.

And, oh-so importantly, DF Mavens’ ice cream positively excels in quality, thanks to its unique variety of flavors, full-bodied taste, rich mouthfeel, and unparalleled creaminess. Certified gluten-free and kosher, and named by VegNews as the Best New Vegan Product at Natural Products Expo West 2013, DF Mavens claims that it has set a “new standard for dairy-free ice cream,” and I honestly cannot argue. DF Mavens produces three lines of ice cream, each based in a different type of non-dairy milk: coconut, soy, and almond. Impressively, all of them harbor the same decadent, silky-smoothness – the almond-based ice creams taste just as rich as the coconut-based ones! Clearly mindful of dietary allergies and restrictions (please note: I don’t include vegan in this categorization since I don’t consider it an inherently restrictive diet), DF Mavens also produces two sugar-free flavors, both of which have a coconut base.

And DF Mavens is opening a storefront in the West Village of NYC sometime this year! (Photo via EvGrieve.com).

And DF Mavens is opening a storefront in the West Village of NYC sometime this year! (Photo via EvGrieve.com).

The generous folks at DF Mavens sent me a sampling of five of their flavors, including at least one from each of the company’s three lines. From the coconut milk line, I received the Del Lago Chocolate and the Alphonso Mango; from the soy milk line, New Orleans Salted Praline; and from the almond milk line, Mint Almond Cookie and Caramel Apple Almond(NOTE: though the Food Empowerment Project does not yet include DF Mavens on its list of recommended ethically sourced chocolate companies, the folks at DF Mavens assured me that they source the chocolate in their ice cream from areas where industry slavery is not practiced.)

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Described as “a deep dark dreamy chocolate crafted from the finest cacao in Venezuela’s tropical lowlands,” the Del Lago Chocolate held a complexity of flavor that I certainly don’t usually expect from chocolate ice creams – they tend to taste rather one-note to me, and have since childhood. Surprisingly, I found myself “mmm”-ing just as happily with spoonfuls of DF Mavens’ chocolate ice cream as with the others sent to me.

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Harboring a more unctuous creaminess than the other ice creams, the Alphonso Mango boasted small chunks of mango for pleasant textural interest and provided me with clear recollections of biting into juicy, succulent fresh mangoes.

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Perhaps my favorite ice cream of the bunch, the New Orleans Salted Praline featured a swirling river of sticky salted caramel punctuated by glorious pecans – the richest and sweetest of all nuts, in my humble opinion. I only wish that each pint of this flavor contained a higher density of pecans, for I enthusiastically welcome a contrast of crunchiness among the otherwise smooth ice cream.

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Though not usually a huge fan of mint-flavored desserts, I absolutely inhaled the Mint Almond Cookie ice cream, which offered a chunk of homemade, gluten-free, Oreo-like sandwich cookie with every intensely minty spoonful.

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Finally, the Caramel Apple Almond sufficiently wowed me with its saccharine flavor and sticky texture, impressively akin to a real caramel apple – indeed, DF Mavens claims that licking a cone of this ice cream “is almost the same as eating a caramel apple.” Crunch factor aside, I would have to concur in regards to flavor.

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After this foray into DF Mavens’ world of non-dairy ice creams, I’m eager to taste their other flavors, most notably the Cardamom Pistachio, Peanut Butter Fudge Mash, Sicilian Hazelnut Truffle, and Key Lime Creme.

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I’m also eager to help one of you enjoy a DF Mavens foray of your own! Simply click on one of the links at the top and bottom of this post to enter a Rafflecopter giveaway for your chance to win four whole pints of DF Mavens vegan ice cream. Unfortunately, due to shipping costs and product sensitivity, this giveaway is only open to residents of New York City and its five boroughs. For those of you not included in this stipulation, check out the retailers near you that carry DF Mavens or order some for yourself!

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Sunday, August 3, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

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Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with free product samples. All opinions are completely my own.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-25-14}

Before I dive into today’s post, I’d like to say a huge congratulations to the winner of my Salad Samurai cookbook giveaway: Lydia Greenfield! Thanks to all who entered, and be sure to look out for my next giveaway of the summer.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

For this eighth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews), revel in hearty and brightly flavored rice paper rolls, oh-so-chewy cashew cookies, the epitome of a summery dinner, stories on climate change and the sure demise of capitalism, accurate coverage (unique among the skewed U.S. mainstream media) of the current situation in Gaza, and an intersectional analysis of the infamous Bill and Lou saga.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Minimalist Baker.

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

 I tend to believe that a dish as simple and difficult to ruin as rice paper rolls don’t merit a recipe, but this one from Minimalist Baker proves unique and mouthwatering enough to make me eat my words (and hopefully one of those rolls…). Though the crispy tofu in particular drew me to the recipe, I can hardly argue with a tangy almond butter dipping sauce or a generous helping of fresh mint and cilantro to offset the recipe’s richness. Recreating this recipe (which I intend to do next week) also provides me with another use for my favorite brown rice paper wrappers.
Sweet
Chewy Cashew Cookies
via Lunchbox Bunch
Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

I’m a gigantic fan of baking with nut flours, due to the rich mouthfeel and tender texture that they impart in scones, muffins, and cookies alike. Not only do these cookies from Kathy Patalsky feature the sweet, ivory-hued flour ground from cashews, they also employ my all-time favorite sweetener: maple syrup. Though making the entire recipe calls for a substantial amount of pretty expensive ingredients, halving the recipe renders the certain joy of these cookies much more accessible.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Zucchini Noodles & Kale in Tomato-Basil Sauce with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes & Portobello-Walnut Balls
adapted from This Rawsome Vegan Life

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This fabulously summery recipe inspired by Emily at Rawsome Vegan Life provides a fresh, complexly flavored, and texturally contrasted take on spaghetti and meat(less) balls that knocked the tiny socks off of my tastebuds. I tweaked Emily’s original recipe a bit by baking the portobello-walnut balls and roasted the tomatoes instead of dehydrating, and adding shredded kale to the zucchini noodles for a kick of green leafies. Even so, Emily’s flavor-combining genius shone through. With succulent and juicy cherry tomatoes, toothsome zucchini noodles coated in a creamy sauce, and meltingly tender portobello balls with a hint of sweetness from the dates, this dish offered me an ideal mid-summer meal.

Must-Read News Article

I’d like to feature four articles this week, grouped into two categories:

The first set of stories centers on climate change, with one from The Nation offering advice from a longtime climate activist on advocacy strategies that I see as helpful to activists of all stripes, and the second from Mother Jones revealing that the most frequent instances of climate denial occur in anglophone countries with strong neoliberal regimes.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Speaking of everyone’s favorite topic of neoliberal capitalism, the second set of stories offer hopeful views on the future of our economic system. The first story from Al Jazeera suggests that Millennials view capitalism with a heavy does of skepticism, while the second story from Truthout features an interview with sociologist William I. Robinson on the crisis of capitalism. Combined, the two stories provide me with optimism that our up-and-coming generation are poised to finish off the dying remains of capitalism and foster a new, more equitable and just economic system.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Today’s podcast/video recommendation comes as a two-parter, focusing on the increasingly dire state of Gaza thanks to an appalling abuse of power from Israel and its allies (most notably the U.S.). Though Israel proponents continue to insist that the country has a right to defend itself from Hamas’ unsophisticated rockets, they refuse to acknowledge the history of Israel’s occupation of Palestine and the enormous disparity in economic, military, and political power that has resulted.

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

I’d first like to point you toward an episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, in which John and Molly call out the U.S. media’s “spectacular failure” in covering Israel’s attacks on Gaza (I mean, NBC misled viewers to believe that the scenes of Gazan destruction they showed took place in Israel, for goodness’ sake).

Thankfully, progressive news outlets like Democracy Now! have provided far more truthful (read: unsullied by a desire to conform to the U.S. government’s status quo) coverage of the current situation in Gaza. Indeed, Democracy Now! has devoted most of its air time over the past week to highlighting the voices of those on the ground in Gaza and those for justice in Palestine, including correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, the executive director of a Gaza hospital shelled by Israel, an NBC veteran reporter pulled from Gaza after accurately reporting on the situation, members of Jewish Voices for Peace arrested for protesting an organization that raises money for the Israel Defense Forces, and MSNBC’s sole Palestinian voice Rula Jebreal who faces persecution for publicly criticizing her own network’s coverage of the Israel-Palestine conflict. These clips from Democracy Now! clearly demonstrate the horrifyingly skewed coverage by U.S. mainstream media of the current Gaza situation.

Book Recommendation

The Oxen at the Intersection: A Collison
by pattrice jones

Photo via Lantern Books.

Photo via Lantern Books.

I’ve long supported the work of pattrice jones, the fierce intersectional activist and co-founder of VINE Sanctuary, and cannot recommend more highly her most recent book. Part retelling of the Bill and Lou saga; part analysis of its historical, sexist, racist, and ableist components; and part suggestions of what animal advocates can learn from the controversy, pattrice with characteristic fearlessness provides a work of huge value to anyone involved or interested in intersectional activism. A short and accessible read, this book took me all of two days to finish, and I found myself enthralled in every moment. An absolutely fascinating read.

In solidarity, Ali.

Am I a Vegan? | Walnut Scones with Maple Glaze

I have fond childhood memories of walking into a local bakery with my mother, greeted by the comforting aroma of sugary dough, and leaving with our favorite treat: a generously sized, dense yet flaky walnut scone with lip-smackingly sweet maple glaze. This scone was not vegan, and I – but a wee child who had not yet learned of animal suffering or intersecting oppressions – didn’t call myself one either.

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But should I now? Label myself as “vegan,” that is. The use of the word “vegan” comes up as a rather hotly debated topic in animal rights circles, from those who prefer to employ “vegetarian” in their advocacy – assuming that non-vegans feel less threatened by the word – to James McWilliams who just published a blog post on “The Vegan Identity,” to the Hens of Our Hen House who often discuss vegan diction on their podcast.

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Recently, as I read bell hooks’ Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center – recommended on my latest edition of “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” (#NewsandChews) – I came upon a passage that spoke directly to the issue of labeling oneself with a certain identity. Here, I’d like to quote the passage at length:

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“Focusing on feminism as political commitment, we resist the emphasis on individual identity and lifestyle…Such resistance engages us in revolutionary praxis. The ethics of Western society informed by imperialism and capitalism are personal rather than social. They teach us that the individual good is more important than the collective good and consequently that individual change is of greater significance than collective change…To emphasize that engagement with feminist struggle as political commitment we could avoid using the phrase “I am a feminist” (a linguistic structure designed to refer to some personal aspect of identity and self-definition) and could state “I advocate feminism.” Because there has been undue emphasis placed on feminism as an identity or lifestyle, people usually resort to stereotyped perspectives on feminism. Deflecting attention away from stereotypes is necessary if we are to revise our strategy and direction. I have found that saying “I am a feminist” usually means I am plugged into preconceived notions of identity, role, or behavior. When I say “I advocate feminism” the response is usually “what is feminism?” A phrase like “I advocate” does not imply the kind of absolutism that is suggested by “I am.” It does not engage us in the either/or dualistic thinking that is the central ideological component of all systems of domination in Western society. It implies that a choice has been made, that commitment to feminism is an act of will. It does not suggest that by committing oneself to feminism, the possibility of supporting other political movements is negated.”

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In the interest of our discussion, we can replace hooks’ use of “feminist” and “feminism” with “vegan” and “veganism” (though revolutionary feminism is also something in which all of us should be involved). For now, I find myself persuaded by hooks’ argument, and intend to begin discussing my veganism as a practice rather than as an identity. This linguistic shift in no way signals a wavering of my commitment to veganism (nor do I think that hooks’ implies that such a shift would do so), but a new mode of discussing the lifestyle in the hopes of reaching more people and furthering the movement in a revolutionary direction.

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I find this discussion absolutely fascinating, and would love to hear any and all of your thoughts.

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In return for your shared views on the topic, I give you a veganized recipe for those walnut scones of my childhood, dedicated to my mother.

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Walnut Scones with Maple Glaze

Makes 16 mini scones or 8 large scones.

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
1/2 cup almond meal
1 tbsp baking powder
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/3 cup cold coconut oil, chopped into small pieces
1/3 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup cold water
1 tbsp vanilla extract
1 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

1 cup coconut sugar
1 tbsp arrowroot powder or cornstarch
(or use 1 cup of maple sugar in the place of both of these ingredients)
1/8 tsp sea salt
1 tbsp melted coconut oil
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 cup maple syrup

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a medium mixing bowl, combine the flour, almond meal, baking powder, and salt. Stir well to combine.

Add the pieces of cold coconut oil to the flour mixture and use the tips of your fingers to “cut” (integrate wholly) the solid oil into the flour. You should end up with a mixture of grainy texture that almost resembles sand.

Add the maple syrup, cold water, and vanilla to the dry mixture and stir well to combine. At first it will seem like there isn’t enough liquid to wet the dough, but have faith and keep mixing until you have thoroughly incorporated the wet and dry ingredients. Stir in 3/4 of the chopped walnuts.

Flour a flat surface like your kitchen counter and drop the entire bowl of dough onto the surface. Form the dough into a disc that’s about 1 inch thick all the way around. Use a sharp knife to cut the circle into 16/8 (depending on if you want mini or large scones) even wedges. Separate the wedges and place them onto the parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 13-15 minutes for mini scones, and 15-17 minutes for larger scones, or until lightly golden brown.

While the scones bake, prepare the glaze. If using the coconut sugar-starch mixture, whir the coconut sugar and arrowroot or cornstarch together in a food processor until a fine powder forms. Whisk together the glaze ingredients in a small bowl until smooth and creamy. You may need to warm the glaze in the microwave for a couple of seconds to render it pourable. Once the scones have cooled for a few minutes, spoon the glaze into the middle of each scone and let it drizzle down the sides. While the glaze is still wet, sprinkle each scone with the remaining 1/4 of the chopped walnuts.

These scones will keep for 3-5 days in an air-tight container at room temperature, or for a couple of months in the freezer.

You can make these scones gluten-free by replacing the flours with 1 cup brown rice flour and 1 cup almond meal.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-18-14}

This Saturday, I will review/reviewed (depending on what day you read this post) Terry Hope Romero’s new cookbook Salad Samurai on Episode 236 of the Our Hen House podcast. For all you OHH listeners looking for the giveaway I promised, head over to this post. Thanks for entering!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the seventh installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! Get ready for a smoky-sweet summery pizza, an equally summery and oh-so mouthwatering creamy dessert, the best vegan “egg” salad on the planet, viable and inspiring solutions to our current crisis of democracy, the refugee crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border, and a necessary read for all intersectional activists. Shall we?

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

BBQ Pulled “Pork” Pizza with Mango Salsa and Cashew Cream
via The Sweet Life

Photo via The Sweet Life.

Photo via The Sweet Life.

I have an understandably enormous love for barbeque sauce – smoky, sweet, tangy…what’s not to adore? Indeed, in my pre-vegan days I never actually consumed a pulled pork sandwich, but frequently found my mouth watering over Food Network programs featuring the southern American favorite. Now that I no longer consider pig’s flesh to serve as sustenance, I experience just as intense of a desire for heartily textured chewiness coated in the perfection of barbeque sauce. Sarah’s vegan rendition of pulled pork – using hearts of palm – would surely satisfy this desire, especially when coupled with refreshing mango salsa and cooling cashew cream. If you’ll excuse me, I need to go make a pizza

Sweet

Peanut Butter & Banana Ice Cream Sandwiches
via She Likes Food

Photo via She Likes Food.

Photo via She Likes Food.

Minimal-ingredient banana soft serve ice cream (no ice cream maker required). Dense, chewy peanut butter cookies. The infallible combination of bananas and peanut butter. The singular impeccability of peanut butter itself. If all of these factors combined into one recipe doesn’t constitute a revelatory dessert experience, then I no longer have any interest in sweet treats. Just to make sure, I guess I’ll have to recreate Izzy’s recipe here (twist my arm, jeez. I’ll sub coconut sugar for the brown sugar, though, and omit the chocolate chips).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Tofu “Egg” Salad Sandwich with Buffalo-Maple Cauliflower
Original Recipe

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This week’s best dish doesn’t actually have a recipe to go along with it, as I created it on a whim with the bits and bobs in my dwindling refrigerator. To half a block of frozen and defrosted tofu, I added vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, scallions, and a crap-ton of herbs and spices, to surprisingly produce one of the tangiest, creamiest, most flavor-packed vegan “egg” salads I’ve ever experienced. For the cauliflower, I combined a generous helping of homemade red hot sauce with a bit of maple syrup to coat the cauliflower, then roasted it all in a 450°F oven for about 30 minutes for sticky, spicy, sweet, mapley goodness. An impeccable dinner, the recipe for which you can expect later in the summer.

Must-Read News Article

Crowdsourcing Our Way Out of the Crisis of Democracy
via Kevin Zeese & Margaret Flowers at Truthout

Photo via Truthout.

Photo via Truthout.

In the midst of a ridiculously false notion of “democracy” held up by conventional powers in America, this article truly gives me hope by offering viable alternatives to our broken political (and, consequently, economic, civil, social, etc.) system. So often we focus on critiquing the ills of society – a necessary practice, no doubt – while failing to take concrete action toward not reform, but revolution. The endeavors cited in this article take this hugely important action, and I feel newly inspired by them. Maybe if we can actually implement them, we’ll end up with a nation modeled after Spain’s “communist utopia” of Marinaleda, eh?

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Humanitarian Crisis at the Border
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via Rebecca Blackwell, Associated Press, at Al Jazeera America.

Photo via Rebecca Blackwell, Associated Press, at Al Jazeera America.

While most coverage of the staggering numbers of unaccompanied Latin American minors arriving in the U.S. refers to the situation as a “border crisis,” John and Molly at Radio Dispatch accurately assert that we should actually regard it as a refugee crisis. In Latin American countries like Guatemala and Honduras, children live in rampant poverty and fear of violence, and are essentially seeking asylum in the U.S. As Fernando Protti, regional representative for the U.N. refugee agency told the Associated Press, “They are leaving for some reason. Let’s not send them back in a mechanical way, but rather evaluate the reasons they left their country.” In this episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, John and Molly explain this urgent situation and its political nature in accessible terms.

Other quality news stories regarding this refugee crisis come from Al Jazeera America, Counterpunch, Mother Jones, and Think Progress.

Book Recommendation

Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center
by bell hooks

Photo via Free Thought Blogs.

Photo via Free Thought Blogs.

I don’t think the words exist to describe how pivotal and essential a role this book has played in my psychological growth as an intersectional activist – and with only 160-some pages! hooks critically analyzes the popular feminist movement of the 60s and 70s, pointing out that it worked toward achieving equal power to men for upper-class white women, rather than seeking to end hierarchies of domination for all people, regardless of class, race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, etc. Offering much progressive theoretical knowledge for the development of liberatory social movements, this book will certainly endure much page-tearing and tea-staining as I read it during my every waking free moment. Pick. This. Book. Up. Now.

In solidarity, Ali.

Salad Samurai Cookbook Review & GIVEAWAY!

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

Welcome to yet another summer giveaway here on Farmers Market Vegan! This one particularly thrills me because it involves a category of items of which, despite my striving to avoid conforming to a harmfully consumerist society, I can’t seem to keep my eager hands off: cookbooks. But seriously, folks, I read these things like novels, and I’m not going to embarrass myself by admitting how many reside on my bookshelf.

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Excitingly, one of the latest additions to my shameful collection is Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to Be Vegan to Love (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2014) by Terry Hope Romero. That’s right – this vegan cookbook author extraordinaire has graced the culinary world with yet another masterpiece, which joins the ranks of Terry’s other celebrated works like VeganomiconVegan Eats WorldVegan Latina, and Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World.

Photo via Terry's Facebook.

Photo via Terry’s Facebook.

I don’t exaggerate in the slightest when calling Salad Samurai a masterpiece. With a super sleek design and strikingly lit photos by acclaimed vegan photographer Vanessa K. Rees, this book begs readers to recreate the salads that all but explode out of their photos. Another design aspect that I wholeheartedly appreciate involves the notes that accompany almost every recipe – deemed “The Spin” and “Samurai Stylings” – through which Terry “talks” to readers about preparing or shopping for uncommon ingredients, serving tips, recipe variations, and more.

While Salad Samurai expectedly features a wide variety of flavor-packed, meal-sized salads – expertly organized by season – the book also includes recipe sections for unique dressings; salad “toppers” like spiced nuts, croutons, tofu, tempeh, and seitan; and breakfast “salads” like smoothies, granola, and overnight oats. With this multiplicity of options for salad mixing-and-matching, Terry effectively debunks the myth that salads constitute “rabbit food,” doomed to sad dieting regimens and restricted eating habits. In addition to this impressive recipe array, Salad Samurai also includes a helpful guide to pressing tofu and tips for make-ahead meals for those of us who find ourselves in a rush around mealtime.

Since none of the three recipes I’m sharing with you today call for Terry’s special brand of chia seed dressings, I’d like to make a special note of this genius salad dressing method. While I’m a staunch advocate of oil-full diets (as is The Vegan RD!), Terry introduces the practice of upping the nutrient density of salad dressings without sacrificing that lip-smackingly thick texture that oil lends by substituting chia seeds for a portion of the oil. Not only do the unique gelling properties of chia seeds give the dressings body, they also add important omega-3 fatty acids. Nourishing and delicious.

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My version of the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils

Onto the recipes! Beginning with a salad from the “Spring Salads” section of Salad Samurai, I tried out the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils. The salad features crisp, smoky kale and caramelized scallions marinated with coconut milk and lime juice, layered on top of a texturally fascinating mixture of smooth lentils, juicy tomatoes, and crunchy almonds, with just enough red onion to provide  a sweet sharpness. Offering an impressive multiplicity of flavors that all complimented one another, this recipes yielded a colorful salad that works well with either grilled or broiled (for those of us without grills; hooray for apartment living!) kale.

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Book photo of Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Continuing my recipe experimentation by moving onto the “Summer Salads” section, I recreated perhaps the most prized salad from my reviewing duties: the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad. Somehow managing to strike a balance between rich and deeply flavored yet light and bright, this salad features some of my absolute favorite ingredients, including liquid smoke, maple syrup, smoked paprika, and avocado. The salad calls for pan-roasting the chickpeas for a supremely crispy texture before coating them in a simple homemade barbecue sauce and sprinkling them with nutritional yeast. Those snack-worthy morsels get piled on top of a generous helping of greens, red onion, cherry tomatoes, carrots, and avocado, all tossed in a smoky-sweet paprika dressing that I would happily drink.

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My version of the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Finally, I returned to the Spring salads for a taste of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad – a super fresh-tasting take on traditional heavy pad thai that features “noodles” of asparagus created by taking a vegetables peeler to the stalks. Coupled with toothsome rice noodles, marinated & baked tofu bursting with flavor from a marinade of fresh lemongrass, tons of fresh herbs, a caramelized shallot-lime dressing, and toasted peanuts, the asparagus noodles form a salad that truly showcases Terry’s ability to expertly combine flavors and textures.

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My version of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

So as not to leave you with your mouth hanging wide open from all of this tantalizing talk, the publishers of Salad Samurai have graciously offered to let me share with you the full recipe for the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad! Enjoy, and be sure to enter the giveaway to win a copy of Salad Samurai by following the links at the top and bottom of this post.

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Book photo of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Serves 2.

Pad Thai Salad Ingredients:

4 oz pad thai rice noodles
1/2 lb asparagus
1 cup mung bean sprouts, washed and dried
1 cup lightly packed fresh Thai or sweet basil leaves, chiffonaded
1 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro, coarsely chopped
2 scallions, green part only, thinly sliced
1 batch Lemongrass Tofu (recipe below)
1/2 cup roasted peanuts, coarsely ground
Lime wedges and Sriracha, for serving

Toasted Shallot Dressing Ingredients:

1/4 cup minced shallots
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
2 tbsp coconut sugar or organic brown sugar, plus more for serving
1 tbsp tamarind concentrate
1 tbsp soy sauce, plus more for serving

Boil the rice noodles according to package directions and cook only until al dente (1 or 2 minutes less than directed). Drain, rinse with cold water, and cover with cold water until ready to use.

Wash and trim the tough stem ends from the asparagus. Trim the heads from the asparagus and set aside. Use a Y-shaped peeler to shred the asparagus stalks into long ribbons and slice into thin strips the remaining pieces that are too awkward to shred. Transfer the asparagus ribbons to a mixing bowl and add the mung bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, and scallions.

In a skillet over medium heat, fry the shallots, garlic, ginger, and oil until the shallots are golden brown, about 3 minutes. Add the asparagus tips, saute 1 minute, remove from the heat, and cool for 2 minutes. Transfer the asparagus tip mixture to the bowl with the ribbons. Drain the rice noodles and add the the asparagus salad.

Whisk together the lime juice, sugar, tamarind, and soy sauce and pour over the salad. Toss to coat everything with the dressing. Mound the salad in serving bowls and garnish with strips of Lemongrass Tofu (below) and sprinkle with peanuts. Devour, but graciously offer wedges of lime, Sriracha, a small dish of coconut sugar, and soy sauce for dining companions to season their own dish to taste.

For zucchini noodle pad thai: Replace the rice noodles with homemade zucchini or yellow summer squash for an even lighter dish. You’ll need a little more than 1/2 pound of squash. Use the Y-shaped peeler to create long, thin strands similar to the asparagus “noodles” for the above salad. Proceed as directed.

Plan ahead like a samurai: Prepare the Lemongrass Tofu (below) a day in advance and heat up just before serving.

Lemongrass Tofu

Serves 2 as a salad topping.

Ingredients:

1 pound extra-firm tofu or super-firm tofu (no pressing necessary for the latter)
2 tbsp maple syrup
4 tsp tamari
1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped fresh or prepared lemongrass
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tsp peanut oil or olive oil

If using extra-firm tofu, press the tofu first. Slice the tofu into thin 1/4-inch strips. Preheat the oven to 400°F and coat the bottom and sides of a 13 x 9-inch ceramic or glass baking dish with cooking spray.

Combine the maple syrup, tamari, lemongrass, garlic, and oil in the baking dish and whisk together. Arrange the tofu slices in the marinade and set aside while the oven is preheating, about 15 minutes. Occasionally stir around the tofu strips.

Bake the tofu for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and flip the strips over. Bake another 15 to 20 minutes, until the strips are golden and the marinade is absorbed. Serve warm or chilled. Store chilled and consume within 2 days for best flavor.

From Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romero. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014.

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Thursday, July 25, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with a free copy of the cookbook. All opinions are completely my own.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-11-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

The sixth installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News features two creative and decadent animal-free recipes for traditionally animal-based dishes (one savory and one sweet); a gorgeously composed salad out of a much-anticipated cookbook; problematic coverage of recent developments in the Israel-Palestine conflict; the racist practices of the National Security Agency; and a book that every food justice advocate should have on their shelf.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Filet O’ Chickpea Sandwich with Tartar Sauce Slaw
via Keepin’ It Kind

Photo via Keepin' It Kind.

Photo via Keepin’ It Kind.

Kristy’s culinary creativity never ceases to amaze me, and she showcases her talent once again in this summery, sea-inspired sandwich. I’ve found myself on a vegan “seafood” kick lately, craving chickpea “tuna” salad sandwiches and experimenting with vegan smoked salmon from Sophie’s Kitchen in an animal-free, homemade version of bagels and lox. As such, Kristy’s fried chickpea-artichoke patty topped with creamy tartar sauce-coated slaw is supremely exciting my tastebuds. Plus, there’s vegan mayo involved. And man, I love me some vegan mayo.

Sweet

Hazelnut Mousse Parfaits with Strawberries & Pretzels
via Artful Desperado

Photo via Artful Desperado.

Photo via Artful Desperado.

The other night, I had the immense pleasure of dining at V-Note, an all-vegan bistro on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, and reveling in their creamy, silky-smooth, decadent, rich, mind-boggling rendition of tiramisu. The dessert featured coconut cream, coffee-soaked pastry, and chocolate syrup layered in a glass tumbler, parfait-like. Still reeling from the experience of the tiramisu, I feel called to this Hazelnut Mousse Parfait, especially considering my deep adoration of hazelnuts. Paired with salty pretzels and juicy strawberries, this mousse may just pave my path to replicating my tiramisu-induced happiness.

Be sure, of course, to use cocoa included on the Food Empowerment Project’s approved chocolate list to ensure that you don’t contribute to the slave practices of the vast majority of the global chocolate industry.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Raw Cobb Salad
via the Choosing Raw cookbook by Gena Hamshaw

raw cobb salad

I’ve eagerly anticipated the release of my dear friend Gena‘s cookbook for over a year now, and I’m absolutely thrilled to have its physical manifestation gracing my bookshelves today. While you’ll have to wait until later in the summer when my in-depth review of the cookbook will be featured on the Our Hen House podcast, my excitement for Choosing Raw the cookbook overflows such that I feel then need to offer you all a sneak preview. As part of my recipe-testing for the OHH review, I recreated Gena’s Raw Cobb Salad – an expertly composed dish of lettuce drizzled in a creamy, smoky red pepper-cashew dressing, topped with rows of succulent heirloom tomato, buttery avocado, homemade tangy cashew cheese, and crispy eggplant bacon. A rainbow of flavors in a rainbow of a plate.

Must-Read News Article

What Fuels the Violence Against Palestinian and Israeli Youths?
via Counterpunch

Mourners carry the bodies of fighters Osama al-Hosomi and Mohammed Fasih during their funeral in Gaza City, 27 June. The two were killed and a third was wounded in an Israeli air strike. Photo via Ashraf Amra, APA Images, Electronic Intifada.

Mourners carry the bodies of fighters Osama al-Hosomi and Mohammed Fasih during their funeral in Gaza City on June 27. The two were killed and a third was wounded in an Israeli air strike. Photo via Ashraf Amra, APA Images, Electronic Intifada.

While heated for years now, the Israel-Palestine conflict has received considerable media attention in the past week due to the murder of three Israeli teenagers in occupied Palestinian land. Problematically, however, the coverage of this event has largely failed to mention Israel’s 60-year campaign of occupation against the Palestinians, as well as the collective punishment that Israel has unleashed upon the Palestinian population. Such punishment has included destroying Palestinian homes, farms, and Mosques; abducting over 600 Palestinians; and bombing the people of Gaza with 34 air strikes in one night. This article from Counterpunch fleshes out the pro-Israel media coverage surrounding these events, as well as speculates upon what drives Israel’s abuse of the Palestinian people.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Spied on for Being Muslim? NSA Targets Named in Snowden Leaks Respond to U.S. Gov’t Surveillance
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

This week, the newly launched NSA-whistleblowing site The Intercept published a lengthy investigative report based upon documents leaked by Edward Snowden that identify five prominent Muslim Americans spied on by the National Security Agency. Glenn Greenwald, a founding editor of The Intercept, joins the Democracy Now! team to discuss how “the only thing [the five spied-on individuals] really had in common is that they are all politically active American Muslims. And that seems to be enough in the intelligence community to render these people suspicious.”

Also in the segment, Democracy Now! airs a video from The Intercept of Nihad Awad, the executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the country’s largest Muslim civil rights group. Nihad responds to the government surveillance he experienced:

“I was not aware that I was under surveillance, except recently. And I’m outraged that as an American citizen, my government, after decades of civil rights struggle, still the government spies on political activists and civil rights activists and leaders. It is outrageous, and I’m really angry that despite all the work that we have been doing in our communities to serve the nation, to serve our communities, we are treated with suspicion.”

Wonderful coverage of a hugely important report revealing the intensely racist practices of the U.S. government.

Book Recommendation

Stuffed and Starved
by Raj Patel

Photo via IndieBound.

Photo via IndieBound.

I would call Raj Patel’s book Stuffed and Starved a must-read for anyone involved in or concerned with the global food justice movement. The captivatingly written book recounts Patel’s investigation into food systems around the world, uncovering the reasons behind famines in Africa and Asia, the rampant poverty of farmers in Latin America due to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and more. In doing so, Patel clearly displays that the enormous power of controlling the global food system lies in the hands of just a few wealthy corporations and governments. Once you pick this book up, you honestly will not want to put it down (nor should you!).

In solidarity, Ali.

Ranch Potato Salad | Enjoying Food, Enjoying Life

Before I get into today’s post, I’d like to point you toward Episode 234 of the Our Hen House podcast, where you can hear all about the top five most fabulous vegan eats that I enjoyed during my two-week trip to Italy back in March. The rampant vegan-friendliness of Italian cuisine might surprise you!

I also want to thank you all for the outpouring of positive feedback on my recent post on vegan privilege. Thank you all for your kind words and willingness to engage in a tough yet hugely important issue.

If you checked out the latest installment of my Vegan Chews & Progressive News series (#NewsandChews), you most likely noticed the tantalizing plate of food featured in the “Best Recipe I Made This Week” section. Along with a pile of buffalo tempeh and a sweet wilted kale salad, the featured dinner included a mound of young, multicolored potatoes dotted with verdant sweet peas and coated in the ubiquitous childhood favorite veggie dip: ranch dressing. Though, probably unlike the mayo-based ranch of your youth (definitely of mine), the making of this particular dressing did not contribute to the dumping of live chickens into trash pits, the gassing or grinding up of male chicks, or the forced molting of hens (but those are all just “standard industry practices,” right? No biggie?).

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While my switching from egg-based ranch dressing to a vegan, oil-based version in part represents a desire to foster a kinder world, my new-found enthusiasm for vegan mayo represents an act of kindness to myself. Back in the darkest days of my eating disorder, I abided by all sorts of  self-imposed, nonsensical food restrictions based on nutrition pseudo-science: no peanut butter because it’s susceptible to mold, only minute amounts of tofu and tempeh because processed soy causes breast cancer (actually the opposite), no maple syrup or agave nectar because even minimally refined sweeteners are the devil’s handiwork, etc. Policing my every bite of food for its “purity” of health, eating became an act of stress (that my food was optimally “healthy”) and self-punishment (if it wasn’t or if I ate “too much” of it). Because my disorder consumed my identity, this stress and self-punishment permeated the vast majority of my everyday life.

ranch potato salad (2)

Fast forward through a ton of psychological healing involving the refocusing of my attention off of food and onto a cause larger than myself (read: animal rights), as well as the cultivation of self-respect through a now approaching six-year yoga practice, I found myself able not only to enjoy the singular act of eating, but to enjoy the continuous act of life.

Life! That once-unhappy phenomenon through which I struggled throughout high school in irritable, depressive, static fashion became an interactive cornucopia of opportunity, action, and joy. My utmost goal transformed from achieving optimal “health” through “pure,” absolutely unprocessed diet, and to bettering the world by fighting against multiple societal oppression while finding pleasure in the everyday.

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Okay, so what does this have to do with vegan mayo? Well, my now-beloved Vegenaise once existed among my extensive list of forbidden ingredients (it was a processed product that contained soy protein, for pete’s sake!!!!). Though it may appear inconsequential to the unknowing witness, my ability to consume and absolutely revel in enjoyment of the foods on my past taboo list—including maple syrup, vegan cheese like Daiya, vegan meat products like Field Roast, and non-dairy ice cream like DF Mavens—constitutes an enormous positive leap in my psychological health and relationship with food.

Back to that Ranch Potato Salad. Bursting with freshness from a hearty dose of herbs and tanginess from that much-adored vegan mayo, I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to be able to enjoy this perfect-for-summer salad without even the slightest twinge of self-hate. Here’s to enjoying food, and enjoying life.

ranch potato salad (2)

Ranch Potato Salad

Serves 4.

Ranch Dressing Ingredients (loosely adapted from Betty Goes Vegan):

3/4 cup vegan mayonnaise (Organic Vegenaise and Just Mayo are my favorites)
8 oz (half a package) silken tofu
2 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
2 tbsp fresh dill, chopped
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tsp tahini
2 tsp nutritional yeast
1 1/2 tsp tamari
1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
2 tsp onion powder
1/4 tsp freshly group black pepper

Salad Ingredients:

Sea salt for the boiling water
1 lb fingerling potatoes (I used a mix of yellow, red, and blue)
2 cups green peas, fresh or frozen

Scrub the potatoes and place them in a large pot. Fill the pot about 3/4 of the way full, sprinkle a generous amount of salt into the water, cover, and bring to a boil. Keep the water at a rolling boil for about 10 minutes, until the potatoes are tender and can be pierced easily with a fork. Add the peas and boil for another minute. Drain and let cool until you can comfortably handle the potatoes.

Meanwhile, combine all of the dressing ingredients in the bowl of a food processor, and blend until very smooth.

Once the potatoes are cool enough to handle, slice each potato in half (or in quarters, if larger) and place in a large bowl. Add the peas, then add about 1 cup of the ranch dressing, or enough to coat the potatoes and peas to your liking (you may not use all of the dressing. Oh no! Leftover tangy, creamy deliciousness! Whatever will you do?). Stir the mixture until the potatoes and peas are evenly coated with the dressing. Serve warm.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-4-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy 4th of July! While the news highlighted in this fifth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News may not contribute to your patriotism, July 4th still provides a fabulous excuse to fire up the grill for some summer veggies and dig into a pint of non-dairy ice cream. Let’s get to it!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Strawberry Sweet Rolls with Lemon-Caramel Glaze
via Yup, It’s Vegan

vegan_strawberry_sweet_rolls_lemon_caramel_glaze_1-1024x768

Photo via Yup, It’s Vegan.

Though the end of strawberry season is upon us in Brooklyn (hellooo, cherries!), Shannon offers up a chewy, yeasty, doughy, succulent, mouthwatering recipe to make creative use (not that eating them unadorned isn’t a fabulous use) of any late-season strawberries you might be lucky enough to snag. I expect that these whole-grain, refined sugar-free sweet rolls would provide both a comforting breakfast and a lovely warm-weather dessert, perfect for enjoying on the patio just before sunset.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Ranch Potato Salad, Buffalo Tempeh with Homemade Sauce, and Sweet Kale Salad
via Betty Goes Vegan, Post Punk Kitchen, Emeril Lagasse, and Chef Mickiyah

dinner

The “recipe” highlight of this week is actually a full meal made up of three components. The first: a Ranch Potato Salad with sweet green peas and a vegan ranch dressing adapted from the vegan-Betty Crocker remix cookbook Betty Goes Vegan. The second: crispy sauteed tempeh simmered in homemade buffalo sauce, inspired by Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s recipe with a DIY twist. The third: a warm salad of wilted kale in a succulent sauce of Dijon mustard and coconut sugar with a sprinkling of juicy raisins, courtesy of Chef Mickiyah of Woodland’s Vegan Bistro (remember my rave review of this DC vegan hot spot last summer?). Hearty, boldly flavored, and nourishing, this dinner would have impressed any July 4th-celebrating non-vegan.

Must-Read News Article

This past week brought an onslaught of landmark court decisions, both inside and outside of the U.S.

canadian-harper-pipeline-protest

Photo via Grist.

Via Grist: In Canada, the Supreme Court ruled that any First Nation land that was never formally ceded to the Canadian government cannot be developed without consent of those First Nations that have a claim to it. In addition to challenging the Northern Gateway oil pipeline that would run from Alberta to China, the ruling recognizes the rights of the First Nations whose land the U.S. and Canada colonized long ago, and who have endured heaps of discrimination ever since. Way to go, Canadian Supreme Court.

140627_BFAST_Court.jpg.CROP.promo-mediumlarge

Photo via Slate.

Back home in the U.S., however, the Supreme Court produced decisions much less worth celebrating. Via Slate, Truthout, and Mother Jones: Not only did the Court strike down a Massachusetts law mandating a 35-foot buffer zone that anti-abortion protesters couldn’t enter to heckle patients outside of abortion clinics, it also declared that the government couldn’t require closely held businesses to provide their employees with health insurance that covers types of birth control that offend the owner’s religious beliefs. Both decisions severely infringe upon women’s health and reproductive rights, essentially indicating that corporations constitute “people” more so than do women. A much more sarcastic “way to go” to you, SCOTUS.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

BEST OF: Melissa Gira Grant on sex work, savior complexes, and a vegan dominatrix
via Citizen Radio

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Photo via Citizen Radio.

The topic of sex workers and their rights proves hotly debated, even in feminist circles, as many well-meaning folks attempt to control the actions of women who find themselves in precarious situations and choose to engage in sex work in order to get by. In this “Best Of” episode of Citizen Radio, Melissa Gira Grant—author of Playing the Whore, which is definitely next on my reading list—explains the politics behind the issue of sex workers with elegance, clarity, and wit. A must-listen.

For more information on sex workers’ rights, check out this recent article on Truthout, entitled “Cutting Off Sex Work Advertising Sites Disrupts Communities, Not Trafficking.”

Book Recommendation

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
by Matt Taibbi

9780812993424_custom-ba58a9cf1305ca65bf6412ab0b014064c6b49cf6-s2-c85

Photo via NPR.

While anyone who hasn’t lived under a slab of tofu for the past few decades has clearly seen the staggering wealth gap into which capitalism has sent our country spiraling, Matt Taibbi highlights the concrete impacts that this gap has upon the bodies of the poor and the criminal justice system. Switching between narrating startling stories of corporate/Wall Street money laundering and the clear discrimination in policing against people of color, Taibbi demonstrates the stark contrast between the treatment of the rich and poor in arrests, trials, and punishments. For example. on the one hand, the police arrest an impoverished Black man for “obstructing traffic” by standing in front of the door of his own home, while “too-big-to-fail” companies like HSBC receive no more than a slap on the wrist for major corporate fraud. A book to make your blood boil and your cynical laughter to ring.

In solidarity, Ali.

Seaweed & Edamame Salad | Thoughts on Vegan Privilege

Before introducing today’s recipe, I’m thrilled to announce the three winners of my most recent giveaway for two free pints of Luna & Larry’s Coconut Bliss vegan ice cream. Congratulations to Becca FergusonRosie Riccio DeRensis, and Megan Digeon! Enjoy the creamy, decadent, coconutty goodness.

I got myself into a Facebook skirmish the other day. I don’t often do so, nor do I know that I can even call this incident a “skirmish,” so much as an instance of me replying to a post I found problematic, and never hearing back from the poster or commentators. The post in question—entitled “Dear White Vegans: This is Your Collection Agency Calling“—elicited enthusiastic responses from two individuals who referred to themselves as “former white, privileged vegans.”

seaweed & edamame salad (1)

I responded as such:

“I agree with many of the sentiments expressed in this article. The current vegan movement contains an onslaught of classist, racist, sexist, and ableist elements. Equating the mass slaughter of animals with genocide and slavery co-opts the unknowable suffering of marginalized peoples in an effort to further another movement.

However, I feel that the arguments expressed in this article are a bit ad-hominem. Yes, the way veganism at large is being executed right now is hugely problematic. But at its core, veganism, for me, is simply an extension of an effort to combat the multiplicities of oppression in this world. The exploitation of people of color, women, members of the LGBT community, non-human animals, etc. are not the same, but they share a similar component: an unequal relationship between oppressor and oppressed. I would argue that if this relationship exists anywhere, the possibility for a liberated society becomes greatly hindered.

Consider the powerful activists in history who were also vegan: Cesar Chavez, Thich Nhat Hanh, Coretta Scott King, Angela Davis, and so on. They recognized that while different instances of oppression are not at all the same and each need to be understood in their own right, they are also intimately connected by their being perpetuated by a capitalistic, patriarchal, colonial mindset. To fight against these marginalizing power relations, I feel that we must engage in a multiplicity of social struggles in order to empower habitually silenced groups. And I would argue that these struggles should include non-human animals.”

seaweed & edamame salad (5)

In essence, I don’t want to throw out the idea of veganism simply because its current execution involves a multiplicity of problematic aspects. Instead, since I’m currently privileged enough to enjoy access to a bounty of plant-based foods, an income to obtain such foods, and a social circle that won’t disown my non-mainstream lifestyle, I’ve passionately added animal exploitation to the list of oppressions I’m actively seeking to combat by leading a vegan lifestyle.

Equally important, however, is that in such a privileged position, I must also engage in actively combating the problematic aspects of the vegan movement, in part by constantly reminding myself that the privilege enabling my vegan lifestyle exists among the phenomena that I actively seek to combat. The actions I’m taking against such privilege don’t involve giving up veganism, since that would actively enforce another very real oppression. Instead, the actions involve supporting admirable organizations like Food Not Bombs and the Food Empowerment Project that work to make nourishing vegan options accessible to marginalized communities; working to free myself of the capitalistic mindset of nonstop accumulation of material goods; working not to reinforce my various privileges in my daily interpersonal relations; and educating myself about the histories and current manifestations of various oppressions by devouring anti-racist, feminist, anarchist, etc. literature and following progressive news sources.

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These efforts don’t stop my occupation of a privileged position, of course. I’m still able to take myself out for expensive dinners at upscale restaurants in Manhattan; I’m still able to host giveaways on the ol’ blog for free products while the vivacious homeless man, who hangs out most days on the bench in front of my apartment building, asks for donations; I’m still able to shell out $12.99 for a 6-oz bag of arame seaweed at Whole Foods.

But these privileges don’t exist because I’m vegan, and they’ll still exist even if I were to throw up my hands and give up veganism tomorrow (which I absolutely will not). They exist because I’m a white, straight, cisgender individual with an upper-middle-class background. And veganism is only the first way in which I hope to engage in a challenge to the capitalist, patriarchal, colonial, speciesist, etc. society that makes it super easy to thrive with such identity factors.

Now, before I recommence all this challenging, please excuse me while I enjoy the following salad that I made with a $12.99-bag of arame seaweed that I bought at Whole Foods after being inspired to make such a salad by a dish I enjoyed at a not-inexpensive restaurant in perhaps the most well-off neighborhood in Brooklyn. Don’t we all love a good contradiction?

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Seaweed & Edamame SaladNut Free, Low Sodium, Low Fat.

Serves 2-4 as a side dish.

Ingredients:

3 oz arame or hiziki seaweed (or a blend of the two)
1 cup frozen, shelled edamame
1/2 tbsp coconut oil
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tbsp maple syrup
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp tamari
2 tbsp finely sliced scallions
2 tbsp sesame seeds (both white & black are fine)
1 tsp toasted sesame oil

Place the seaweed in a large bowl and cover with cold water. Let the seaweed soak for 15-60 minutes, or until it has expanded significantly. Drain.

Meanwhile, bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add the shelled edamame and boil for 4-6 minutes. Drain.

When the seaweed has finished soaking, heat the coconut oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and saute for a minute, then add the drained seaweed and saute for about 10 minutes, or until most of the liquid has evaporated from the seaweed. Add the rest of the ingredients except for the toasted sesame oil, raise the heat to medium-high, and saute until most of the liquid has evaporated. Turn off the heat and relocate the seaweed mixture to a medium-sized bowl. Stir in the toasted sesame oil. Chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before serving.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

Until next time, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-27-14}

If you haven’t yet already, don’t miss your chance to win two free pints of amazingly decadent, creamy, rich, and delicious vegan ice cream from Luna & Larry’s Coconut Bliss on my latest giveaway!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

This week’s News & Chews (fourth edition!) features the wonders of summery finger foods and artful salads, a roundup of the need-to-know news stories of the past week, a video highlighting the racial politics of a resurfaced court case from the 1980s, and a book that must grace the shelves of anyone even remotely involved in movement organizing.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Peach & Avocado Summer Rolls with Almond Butter Dipping Sauce
from Anya Kassoff’s new “The Vibrant Table,” via Katie at the Kitchen Door

Photo via Katie at the Kitchen Door.

Photo via Katie at the Kitchen Door.

This recipe, from the new cookbook “The Vibrant Table” by Golubka’s own Anya Kassoff, positively bursts with the goodness of summer produce, including juicy peaches, buttery avocados, and bright basil. Accentuated with the crunch of pistachios, the richness of hazelnut oil, and the unctuousness of a lip-smackingly tantalizing almond butter dipping sauce, these summer rolls all but beg to grace my dinner plate.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Salad Niçoise Bento Box
via Terry Hope Romero’s new “Salad Samurai

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 Lucky enough to receive an advanced copy of culinary genius Terry Hope Romero’s new cookbook (look out for a review & giveaway in mid-July!), I spent the last week reveling in fresh, creative, and hearty salads from the mastermind of the co-author of the vegan Bible “Veganomicon.” I don’t want to give away too much about this gorgeous Niçoise salad pictured above, but I will mention its innovative inclusion of coconut “bacon,” avocado “egg,”  and chickpea “tuna” salad. I’m in love.

Must-Read News Article

This past week saw such a proliferation of important news stories (both uplifting and gut-wrenching) that instead of featuring a single article on this week’s edition of News & Chews, I’d like to feature a “round-up” of sorts.
First, the bad news. From Daily Kos, 40 percent of Detroit residents who cannot afford to pay their water bills due to crippling unemployment and other poverty-related factors risk having their water supply cut off. In response, the Detroit People’s Water Board has petitioned the UN to make clear to the U.S. government that it has violated the human right to water. And in further draconian governmental news, from Al Jazeera, an Egyptian court has sentenced two Al Jazeera journalists to seven years in prison and another to ten years, on charges including aiding the Muslim Brotherhood and reporting false news. This ruling has the powerful potential to have a chilling effect on journalists, and represents a serious blow to journalistic freedom.
Luckily, we still have access to multiple outlets for independent journalism, many of which this week featured a number of hopeful stories. From Truthout, the Presbyterian Church, USA sets an exciting precedent in upsetting the power imbalance between Israel and occupied Palestine by divesting from three corporations that have been continually involved in the Israeli population of the West Ban. Meanwhile in Los Angeles, from BuzzFlash, a federal court struck down a municipal ordinance that made it a crime to use a car for overnight shelter, representing a victory against the city’s anti-homeless agenda that seeks to decrease visibility of the issue rather than securing homes for the homeless. Finally, Gerardo Cerdas, coordinator of the transnational social movement Grito de los Excluidos, shares his uplifting views of the future of social movements at Truthout. I would highly recommend this article to anyone interested or involved in movement organizing, especially those who (like myself) have become (more than a bit) jaded.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

NYC’s $40M Central Park 5 Settlement Resolves Wrongful Jailing Fueled by Race-Baiting, Police Abuse
via Democracy Now!

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Those of us born in the 1990s may have missed the infamous case of the Central Park jogger, in which the NYC court system convicted five black and Latino men of raping a female jogger in Central Park, only to be found innocent decades later after the real rapist came forward and confessed. The five convicted men having already served sentences of up to 13 years, the City of New York has finally reportedly agreed to pay $40 million to the wrongfully convicted men. The most notable aspect of this story involves the racial profiling activities of the NYPD, through which young men of color were targeted as significant dangers to society. Additionally, as professor of sociology Natalie Byfield notes, “the significance of a settlement, to me, is important because it starts to undo what became a historic lie. And I say it in this way because the case itself was the launching pad for a transformation of the juvenile justice system.” So many complexities to this story, and an important case to remember in terms of the racial politics of the U.S.

Book Recommendation

Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy
by Chris Crass

Photo via Racial Justice Allies.

Photo via Racial Justice Allies.

Written by longtime anarchist movement organizer (including with the awesome vegan organization Food Not BombsChris Crass, this book contains an invaluable assortment of reflections upon the history of anti-capitalist organizing in an attempt to learn from past mistakes and advance current movement efforts. From his background as an feminist-informed anti-racist educator of white people, Crass practices self-reflexivity with grace and provides important critiques of the un-discussed privileges and inequalities in past movement efforts. I sincerely hope that this book becomes widely read among activists everywhere.

Until next time, Ali.