Salad Samurai Cookbook Review & GIVEAWAY!

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

Welcome to yet another summer giveaway here on Farmers Market Vegan! This one particularly thrills me because it involves a category of items of which, despite my striving to avoid conforming to a harmfully consumerist society, I can’t seem to keep my eager hands off: cookbooks. But seriously, folks, I read these things like novels, and I’m not going to embarrass myself by admitting how many reside on my bookshelf.

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Excitingly, one of the latest additions to my shameful collection is Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to Be Vegan to Love (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2014) by Terry Hope Romero. That’s right – this vegan cookbook author extraordinaire has graced the culinary world with yet another masterpiece, which joins the ranks of Terry’s other celebrated works like VeganomiconVegan Eats WorldVegan Latina, and Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World.

Photo via Terry's Facebook.

Photo via Terry’s Facebook.

I don’t exaggerate in the slightest when calling Salad Samurai a masterpiece. With a super sleek design and strikingly lit photos by acclaimed vegan photographer Vanessa K. Rees, this book begs readers to recreate the salads that all but explode out of their photos. Another design aspect that I wholeheartedly appreciate involves the notes that accompany almost every recipe – deemed “The Spin” and “Samurai Stylings” – through which Terry “talks” to readers about preparing or shopping for uncommon ingredients, serving tips, recipe variations, and more.

While Salad Samurai expectedly features a wide variety of flavor-packed, meal-sized salads – expertly organized by season – the book also includes recipe sections for unique dressings; salad “toppers” like spiced nuts, croutons, tofu, tempeh, and seitan; and breakfast “salads” like smoothies, granola, and overnight oats. With this multiplicity of options for salad mixing-and-matching, Terry effectively debunks the myth that salads constitute “rabbit food,” doomed to sad dieting regimens and restricted eating habits. In addition to this impressive recipe array, Salad Samurai also includes a helpful guide to pressing tofu and tips for make-ahead meals for those of us who find ourselves in a rush around mealtime.

Since none of the three recipes I’m sharing with you today call for Terry’s special brand of chia seed dressings, I’d like to make a special note of this genius salad dressing method. While I’m a staunch advocate of oil-full diets (as is The Vegan RD!), Terry introduces the practice of upping the nutrient density of salad dressings without sacrificing that lip-smackingly thick texture that oil lends by substituting chia seeds for a portion of the oil. Not only do the unique gelling properties of chia seeds give the dressings body, they also add important omega-3 fatty acids. Nourishing and delicious.

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My version of the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils

Onto the recipes! Beginning with a salad from the “Spring Salads” section of Salad Samurai, I tried out the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils. The salad features crisp, smoky kale and caramelized scallions marinated with coconut milk and lime juice, layered on top of a texturally fascinating mixture of smooth lentils, juicy tomatoes, and crunchy almonds, with just enough red onion to provide  a sweet sharpness. Offering an impressive multiplicity of flavors that all complimented one another, this recipes yielded a colorful salad that works well with either grilled or broiled (for those of us without grills; hooray for apartment living!) kale.

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Book photo of Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Continuing my recipe experimentation by moving onto the “Summer Salads” section, I recreated perhaps the most prized salad from my reviewing duties: the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad. Somehow managing to strike a balance between rich and deeply flavored yet light and bright, this salad features some of my absolute favorite ingredients, including liquid smoke, maple syrup, smoked paprika, and avocado. The salad calls for pan-roasting the chickpeas for a supremely crispy texture before coating them in a simple homemade barbecue sauce and sprinkling them with nutritional yeast. Those snack-worthy morsels get piled on top of a generous helping of greens, red onion, cherry tomatoes, carrots, and avocado, all tossed in a smoky-sweet paprika dressing that I would happily drink.

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My version of the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Finally, I returned to the Spring salads for a taste of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad – a super fresh-tasting take on traditional heavy pad thai that features “noodles” of asparagus created by taking a vegetables peeler to the stalks. Coupled with toothsome rice noodles, marinated & baked tofu bursting with flavor from a marinade of fresh lemongrass, tons of fresh herbs, a caramelized shallot-lime dressing, and toasted peanuts, the asparagus noodles form a salad that truly showcases Terry’s ability to expertly combine flavors and textures.

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My version of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

So as not to leave you with your mouth hanging wide open from all of this tantalizing talk, the publishers of Salad Samurai have graciously offered to let me share with you the full recipe for the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad! Enjoy, and be sure to enter the giveaway to win a copy of Salad Samurai by following the links at the top and bottom of this post.

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Book photo of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Serves 2.

Pad Thai Salad Ingredients:

4 oz pad thai rice noodles
1/2 lb asparagus
1 cup mung bean sprouts, washed and dried
1 cup lightly packed fresh Thai or sweet basil leaves, chiffonaded
1 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro, coarsely chopped
2 scallions, green part only, thinly sliced
1 batch Lemongrass Tofu (recipe below)
1/2 cup roasted peanuts, coarsely ground
Lime wedges and Sriracha, for serving

Toasted Shallot Dressing Ingredients:

1/4 cup minced shallots
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
2 tbsp coconut sugar or organic brown sugar, plus more for serving
1 tbsp tamarind concentrate
1 tbsp soy sauce, plus more for serving

Boil the rice noodles according to package directions and cook only until al dente (1 or 2 minutes less than directed). Drain, rinse with cold water, and cover with cold water until ready to use.

Wash and trim the tough stem ends from the asparagus. Trim the heads from the asparagus and set aside. Use a Y-shaped peeler to shred the asparagus stalks into long ribbons and slice into thin strips the remaining pieces that are too awkward to shred. Transfer the asparagus ribbons to a mixing bowl and add the mung bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, and scallions.

In a skillet over medium heat, fry the shallots, garlic, ginger, and oil until the shallots are golden brown, about 3 minutes. Add the asparagus tips, saute 1 minute, remove from the heat, and cool for 2 minutes. Transfer the asparagus tip mixture to the bowl with the ribbons. Drain the rice noodles and add the the asparagus salad.

Whisk together the lime juice, sugar, tamarind, and soy sauce and pour over the salad. Toss to coat everything with the dressing. Mound the salad in serving bowls and garnish with strips of Lemongrass Tofu (below) and sprinkle with peanuts. Devour, but graciously offer wedges of lime, Sriracha, a small dish of coconut sugar, and soy sauce for dining companions to season their own dish to taste.

For zucchini noodle pad thai: Replace the rice noodles with homemade zucchini or yellow summer squash for an even lighter dish. You’ll need a little more than 1/2 pound of squash. Use the Y-shaped peeler to create long, thin strands similar to the asparagus “noodles” for the above salad. Proceed as directed.

Plan ahead like a samurai: Prepare the Lemongrass Tofu (below) a day in advance and heat up just before serving.

Lemongrass Tofu

Serves 2 as a salad topping.

Ingredients:

1 pound extra-firm tofu or super-firm tofu (no pressing necessary for the latter)
2 tbsp maple syrup
4 tsp tamari
1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped fresh or prepared lemongrass
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tsp peanut oil or olive oil

If using extra-firm tofu, press the tofu first. Slice the tofu into thin 1/4-inch strips. Preheat the oven to 400°F and coat the bottom and sides of a 13 x 9-inch ceramic or glass baking dish with cooking spray.

Combine the maple syrup, tamari, lemongrass, garlic, and oil in the baking dish and whisk together. Arrange the tofu slices in the marinade and set aside while the oven is preheating, about 15 minutes. Occasionally stir around the tofu strips.

Bake the tofu for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and flip the strips over. Bake another 15 to 20 minutes, until the strips are golden and the marinade is absorbed. Serve warm or chilled. Store chilled and consume within 2 days for best flavor.

From Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romero. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014.

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Thursday, July 25, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with a free copy of the cookbook. All opinions are completely my own.

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34 thoughts on “Salad Samurai Cookbook Review & GIVEAWAY!

  1. Those are some great-looking plates you’ve done up there.

    I’ve been telling myself I don’t need to run out and buy this book(*), but I think you just changed my mind. THR is so unbelievably good, and I should’ve known resistance would be futile.

    (*at least not until I’ve finally cooked/veganized my way through “Verdura”–it’s my warm-weather vegetable bible)

    • Thanks a bunch, Amanda! Sigh, I totally understand. Why do the vegan cookbook authors have to keep coming out with such mind-bogglingly wonderful books? ;) And I LOVE Verdura! (If we’re talking about the same book).

  2. My favorite salad topping is definitely beans – any kind! They are so deliciously bite-sized and yet make any salad more filling and satisfying.

    Thanks for the giveaway!

  3. This cookbook looks so awesome. Definitely need it in my life! I read them like novels, too. :]

    I must always have olives for my salads. ALWAYS!

  4. I really like to add some roasted nuts to a salad (pecans, walnut, almonds) – they provide crunch and a delicious taste.
    This book must have lots of recipes for dressings that I would love to try!

  5. I agree with Amanda J. about the dressing being important. For me, the more ingredients in the salad, the better: greens, mushrooms, carrots, beans, dried fruit and nuts for a change in texture. YUM!

  6. Pingback: Episode 236: “Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” | Our Hen House

  7. These recipes look amazing! I always love to put cucumber on my salad, but recently I’ve really enjoyed saved raw beets.

  8. Something to add a bit of crunch: nuts, seeds (especially pumpkin and hemp), or little bits of torn, toasted bread.

  9. These are some of my most favourite things… kale, asparagus, pad thai… YUM :) Great post Ali and a fantastic idea to giveaway this amazing cookbook. A good vegan has to have a stockpile of fabulous vegan cookbooks after all! :) Clea x

  10. Pingback: Blueberry Tamari Greens Bowl & Salad Samurai Giveaway | the taste space

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