Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-1-14}

Don’t forget to enter my latest giveaway for your chance to win 4 pints of DF Mavens’ vegan ice cream! Remember, this giveaway is only open to residents of New York City and its five boroughs.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the ninth installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews) here on Farmers Market Vegan! This one will have your mouth watering with intensely flavorful summer dishes that feature heirloom tomatoes and zucchini, along with a dreamy milkshake that offers an homage to the most perfect sweetener on the planet. Then, get ready to have your activist energies inspired with the urge to make the environmental and animal rights movements more inclusive, to combat government surveillance, and to continue the radical energies of a past uprising in my very own hometown.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Alexandra's Kitchen.

Photo via Alexandra’s Kitchen.

Whenever summer rolls around, I rekindle my amorous relationship with zucchini, whose watery texture and insipid flavor during the colder months yields to the succulent smoothness of the warm-weather squash. This verdant side dish from Alexandra’s Kitchen features my preferred preparation of zucchini – caramelized and meltingly tender – alongside a couple of flavors I’ve been craving lately (say hello to my BFFs mint and capers!). This will certainly make an appearance on my dinner table within the coming weeks.

Sweet
Photo via VegaLife.

Photo via VegaLife.

All 21 members of my vegan living cooperative know supremely well of my unwavering devotion to maple syrup – the first substance that comes to my mind when asked, “if you had to sit in a bathtub filled with one thing…” (I’d happily drink myself out of that situation, thank you very much). I’ve also had such a taste for a nice, thick milkshake of late, so this concoction from the folks at Vega fulfills two of my deepest culinary passions of the moment. Plus, what doesn’t experience tremendous improvement from a sprinkling of coconut bacon? Nothing, that’s what.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Grilled Shiitakes and Green Goddess over Heirloom Tomatoes
via the Vedge Restaurant Cookbook

tomatoes & shiitakes w green goddess (1)

I’ve spoken before on the ol’ blog of the wonders of Vedge Restaurant in Philadelphia and its cookbook, and I’m thrilled to once again lend it ample appreciation. This summery dish from culinary genius Rich Landau features thick, juicy slices of heirloom tomato topped with meatily textured and charred shiitake mushrooms, all doused in drizzled with an herby Green Goddess-style dressing of my one true love vegan mayo, plenty of herbs, and capers. Licking the plate is mandatory.

Must-Read News Article

New Report Expounds on Old Problem: Lack of Diversity in Green Groups” and “Think People of Color Don’t Care About the Environment? Think Again
via Brentin Mock at Grist

Photo via Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment.

Photo via Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment.

In both of these stories, Brentin Mock highlights the problematic lack of inclusion of people of color within the mainstream environmental movement. As he notes, this exclusion proves particularly ironic considering that environmental racism causes communities of color to experience much more intensely the consequences of climate change. For example, Mock cites in the article “a recent study from the University of Minnesota [which] found that black and brown Americans are more often trapped in neighborhoods laden with nitrogen dioxide than their white fellow Americans.”

Of course, people of color don’t currently make up a notable portion of the environmental movement not because they don’t care about the state of our planet, but because of systemic inequalities that, for example, bar people of color from securing jobs in the environmental sector. Additionally, because of the mainstream environmental movement’s overwhelming whiteness, it may not feel like a welcome community for many people of color.

I certainly see this phenomenon present, too, in the animal rights movementa predominantly white movement with racist, classist, sexist, and ableist tendencies. In order to work toward collective liberation for all, regardless of species, race, class, gender, etc., we must confront the oppressions present in the social movements in which we are most involved.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Jeremy Scahill: Leaked U.S. Terrorist Watchlist Rulebook Reveals ‘Global Stop and Frisk Program‘”
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

This Democracy Now! segment features progressive journalists extraordinaire Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux of The Intercept, a recently launched platform dedicated to reporting on the documents provided by NSA whisteblower Edward Snowden and producing “fearless, adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues.” The Intercept’s most recent report focuses on a leaked copy of the secret government guidebook that outlines the characteristics used to classify an individual or group as a “terrorist” target. Democracy Now! lists some of these categorization guidelines:

Both “known” and “suspected” suspects are tracked, and terrorism is so broadly defined that it includes people accused of damaging property belonging to the government or financial institutions. Other factors that can justify inclusion on the watchlist include postings on social media or having a relative already deemed a terrorist.

This guidebook constitutes just one of a plethora of evidence pointing to the creation of a state of complete government surveillance in the U.S.

Book Recommendation

Uprising: How Wisconsin Renewed the Politics of Protest, from Madison to Wall Street
by John Nichols

Photo via Amazon.com.

Photo via Amazon.com.

The other day after stocking up on vegan macarons and Cinnamon Snail doughnuts at the Vegan ShopUp, I hopped a short distance over to Bluestockings, a radical and collectively owned bookstore and activist center (read: my heaven). Not looking for any book in particular, I stumbled upon this book by John Nichols, which caught my eye with its Wisconsin-shaped fist – a symbol I know well from my days as a high school junior in Madison during the ongoing protests against Gov. Scott Walker’s attempt to strip public employees of their collective bargaining rights, and the subsequent occupation of the state capitol. As a youngin’ who lacked a meaningful understanding of class issues and social movements, high-school me didn’t fully understand the pivotal importance of the goings-on of my hometown. This book in part helped me to realize the enormity of all of those marches we students took from our school to the capitol building, those nights spent in sleeping bags on the marble floor of that state building, and the visits of movement leaders like Amy Goodman and Jesse Jacskon to what I thought was my humble city. Now, as I look back on the events of early 2011 in Madison, I’m hugely proud to hail from such a hub of progressivism, and yearn to return to my original community to contribute to the radical energy that helped to shape my current commitment to activism. On Wisconsin!

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-25-14}

Before I dive into today’s post, I’d like to say a huge congratulations to the winner of my Salad Samurai cookbook giveaway: Lydia Greenfield! Thanks to all who entered, and be sure to look out for my next giveaway of the summer.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

For this eighth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews), revel in hearty and brightly flavored rice paper rolls, oh-so-chewy cashew cookies, the epitome of a summery dinner, stories on climate change and the sure demise of capitalism, accurate coverage (unique among the skewed U.S. mainstream media) of the current situation in Gaza, and an intersectional analysis of the infamous Bill and Lou saga.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Minimalist Baker.

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

 I tend to believe that a dish as simple and difficult to ruin as rice paper rolls don’t merit a recipe, but this one from Minimalist Baker proves unique and mouthwatering enough to make me eat my words (and hopefully one of those rolls…). Though the crispy tofu in particular drew me to the recipe, I can hardly argue with a tangy almond butter dipping sauce or a generous helping of fresh mint and cilantro to offset the recipe’s richness. Recreating this recipe (which I intend to do next week) also provides me with another use for my favorite brown rice paper wrappers.
Sweet
Chewy Cashew Cookies
via Lunchbox Bunch
Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

I’m a gigantic fan of baking with nut flours, due to the rich mouthfeel and tender texture that they impart in scones, muffins, and cookies alike. Not only do these cookies from Kathy Patalsky feature the sweet, ivory-hued flour ground from cashews, they also employ my all-time favorite sweetener: maple syrup. Though making the entire recipe calls for a substantial amount of pretty expensive ingredients, halving the recipe renders the certain joy of these cookies much more accessible.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Zucchini Noodles & Kale in Tomato-Basil Sauce with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes & Portobello-Walnut Balls
adapted from This Rawsome Vegan Life

zucchini noodles, roasted tomatoes, portobello-walnut balls (3)

This fabulously summery recipe inspired by Emily at Rawsome Vegan Life provides a fresh, complexly flavored, and texturally contrasted take on spaghetti and meat(less) balls that knocked the tiny socks off of my tastebuds. I tweaked Emily’s original recipe a bit by baking the portobello-walnut balls and roasted the tomatoes instead of dehydrating, and adding shredded kale to the zucchini noodles for a kick of green leafies. Even so, Emily’s flavor-combining genius shone through. With succulent and juicy cherry tomatoes, toothsome zucchini noodles coated in a creamy sauce, and meltingly tender portobello balls with a hint of sweetness from the dates, this dish offered me an ideal mid-summer meal.

Must-Read News Article

I’d like to feature four articles this week, grouped into two categories:

The first set of stories centers on climate change, with one from The Nation offering advice from a longtime climate activist on advocacy strategies that I see as helpful to activists of all stripes, and the second from Mother Jones revealing that the most frequent instances of climate denial occur in anglophone countries with strong neoliberal regimes.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Speaking of everyone’s favorite topic of neoliberal capitalism, the second set of stories offer hopeful views on the future of our economic system. The first story from Al Jazeera suggests that Millennials view capitalism with a heavy does of skepticism, while the second story from Truthout features an interview with sociologist William I. Robinson on the crisis of capitalism. Combined, the two stories provide me with optimism that our up-and-coming generation are poised to finish off the dying remains of capitalism and foster a new, more equitable and just economic system.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Today’s podcast/video recommendation comes as a two-parter, focusing on the increasingly dire state of Gaza thanks to an appalling abuse of power from Israel and its allies (most notably the U.S.). Though Israel proponents continue to insist that the country has a right to defend itself from Hamas’ unsophisticated rockets, they refuse to acknowledge the history of Israel’s occupation of Palestine and the enormous disparity in economic, military, and political power that has resulted.

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

I’d first like to point you toward an episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, in which John and Molly call out the U.S. media’s “spectacular failure” in covering Israel’s attacks on Gaza (I mean, NBC misled viewers to believe that the scenes of Gazan destruction they showed took place in Israel, for goodness’ sake).

Thankfully, progressive news outlets like Democracy Now! have provided far more truthful (read: unsullied by a desire to conform to the U.S. government’s status quo) coverage of the current situation in Gaza. Indeed, Democracy Now! has devoted most of its air time over the past week to highlighting the voices of those on the ground in Gaza and those for justice in Palestine, including correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, the executive director of a Gaza hospital shelled by Israel, an NBC veteran reporter pulled from Gaza after accurately reporting on the situation, members of Jewish Voices for Peace arrested for protesting an organization that raises money for the Israel Defense Forces, and MSNBC’s sole Palestinian voice Rula Jebreal who faces persecution for publicly criticizing her own network’s coverage of the Israel-Palestine conflict. These clips from Democracy Now! clearly demonstrate the horrifyingly skewed coverage by U.S. mainstream media of the current Gaza situation.

Book Recommendation

The Oxen at the Intersection: A Collison
by pattrice jones

Photo via Lantern Books.

Photo via Lantern Books.

I’ve long supported the work of pattrice jones, the fierce intersectional activist and co-founder of VINE Sanctuary, and cannot recommend more highly her most recent book. Part retelling of the Bill and Lou saga; part analysis of its historical, sexist, racist, and ableist components; and part suggestions of what animal advocates can learn from the controversy, pattrice with characteristic fearlessness provides a work of huge value to anyone involved or interested in intersectional activism. A short and accessible read, this book took me all of two days to finish, and I found myself enthralled in every moment. An absolutely fascinating read.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-18-14}

This Saturday, I will review/reviewed (depending on what day you read this post) Terry Hope Romero’s new cookbook Salad Samurai on Episode 236 of the Our Hen House podcast. For all you OHH listeners looking for the giveaway I promised, head over to this post. Thanks for entering!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the seventh installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! Get ready for a smoky-sweet summery pizza, an equally summery and oh-so mouthwatering creamy dessert, the best vegan “egg” salad on the planet, viable and inspiring solutions to our current crisis of democracy, the refugee crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border, and a necessary read for all intersectional activists. Shall we?

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

BBQ Pulled “Pork” Pizza with Mango Salsa and Cashew Cream
via The Sweet Life

Photo via The Sweet Life.

Photo via The Sweet Life.

I have an understandably enormous love for barbeque sauce – smoky, sweet, tangy…what’s not to adore? Indeed, in my pre-vegan days I never actually consumed a pulled pork sandwich, but frequently found my mouth watering over Food Network programs featuring the southern American favorite. Now that I no longer consider pig’s flesh to serve as sustenance, I experience just as intense of a desire for heartily textured chewiness coated in the perfection of barbeque sauce. Sarah’s vegan rendition of pulled pork – using hearts of palm – would surely satisfy this desire, especially when coupled with refreshing mango salsa and cooling cashew cream. If you’ll excuse me, I need to go make a pizza

Sweet

Peanut Butter & Banana Ice Cream Sandwiches
via She Likes Food

Photo via She Likes Food.

Photo via She Likes Food.

Minimal-ingredient banana soft serve ice cream (no ice cream maker required). Dense, chewy peanut butter cookies. The infallible combination of bananas and peanut butter. The singular impeccability of peanut butter itself. If all of these factors combined into one recipe doesn’t constitute a revelatory dessert experience, then I no longer have any interest in sweet treats. Just to make sure, I guess I’ll have to recreate Izzy’s recipe here (twist my arm, jeez. I’ll sub coconut sugar for the brown sugar, though, and omit the chocolate chips).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Tofu “Egg” Salad Sandwich with Buffalo-Maple Cauliflower
Original Recipe

tofu egg salad sandwich & maple-buffalo cauliflower 1

This week’s best dish doesn’t actually have a recipe to go along with it, as I created it on a whim with the bits and bobs in my dwindling refrigerator. To half a block of frozen and defrosted tofu, I added vegan mayo, Dijon mustard, scallions, and a crap-ton of herbs and spices, to surprisingly produce one of the tangiest, creamiest, most flavor-packed vegan “egg” salads I’ve ever experienced. For the cauliflower, I combined a generous helping of homemade red hot sauce with a bit of maple syrup to coat the cauliflower, then roasted it all in a 450°F oven for about 30 minutes for sticky, spicy, sweet, mapley goodness. An impeccable dinner, the recipe for which you can expect later in the summer.

Must-Read News Article

Crowdsourcing Our Way Out of the Crisis of Democracy
via Kevin Zeese & Margaret Flowers at Truthout

Photo via Truthout.

Photo via Truthout.

In the midst of a ridiculously false notion of “democracy” held up by conventional powers in America, this article truly gives me hope by offering viable alternatives to our broken political (and, consequently, economic, civil, social, etc.) system. So often we focus on critiquing the ills of society – a necessary practice, no doubt – while failing to take concrete action toward not reform, but revolution. The endeavors cited in this article take this hugely important action, and I feel newly inspired by them. Maybe if we can actually implement them, we’ll end up with a nation modeled after Spain’s “communist utopia” of Marinaleda, eh?

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Humanitarian Crisis at the Border
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via Rebecca Blackwell, Associated Press, at Al Jazeera America.

Photo via Rebecca Blackwell, Associated Press, at Al Jazeera America.

While most coverage of the staggering numbers of unaccompanied Latin American minors arriving in the U.S. refers to the situation as a “border crisis,” John and Molly at Radio Dispatch accurately assert that we should actually regard it as a refugee crisis. In Latin American countries like Guatemala and Honduras, children live in rampant poverty and fear of violence, and are essentially seeking asylum in the U.S. As Fernando Protti, regional representative for the U.N. refugee agency told the Associated Press, “They are leaving for some reason. Let’s not send them back in a mechanical way, but rather evaluate the reasons they left their country.” In this episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, John and Molly explain this urgent situation and its political nature in accessible terms.

Other quality news stories regarding this refugee crisis come from Al Jazeera America, Counterpunch, Mother Jones, and Think Progress.

Book Recommendation

Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center
by bell hooks

Photo via Free Thought Blogs.

Photo via Free Thought Blogs.

I don’t think the words exist to describe how pivotal and essential a role this book has played in my psychological growth as an intersectional activist – and with only 160-some pages! hooks critically analyzes the popular feminist movement of the 60s and 70s, pointing out that it worked toward achieving equal power to men for upper-class white women, rather than seeking to end hierarchies of domination for all people, regardless of class, race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, etc. Offering much progressive theoretical knowledge for the development of liberatory social movements, this book will certainly endure much page-tearing and tea-staining as I read it during my every waking free moment. Pick. This. Book. Up. Now.

In solidarity, Ali.

Salad Samurai Cookbook Review & GIVEAWAY!

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

Welcome to yet another summer giveaway here on Farmers Market Vegan! This one particularly thrills me because it involves a category of items of which, despite my striving to avoid conforming to a harmfully consumerist society, I can’t seem to keep my eager hands off: cookbooks. But seriously, folks, I read these things like novels, and I’m not going to embarrass myself by admitting how many reside on my bookshelf.

salad samurai (2)

Excitingly, one of the latest additions to my shameful collection is Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to Be Vegan to Love (Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2014) by Terry Hope Romero. That’s right – this vegan cookbook author extraordinaire has graced the culinary world with yet another masterpiece, which joins the ranks of Terry’s other celebrated works like VeganomiconVegan Eats WorldVegan Latina, and Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World.

Photo via Terry's Facebook.

Photo via Terry’s Facebook.

I don’t exaggerate in the slightest when calling Salad Samurai a masterpiece. With a super sleek design and strikingly lit photos by acclaimed vegan photographer Vanessa K. Rees, this book begs readers to recreate the salads that all but explode out of their photos. Another design aspect that I wholeheartedly appreciate involves the notes that accompany almost every recipe – deemed “The Spin” and “Samurai Stylings” – through which Terry “talks” to readers about preparing or shopping for uncommon ingredients, serving tips, recipe variations, and more.

While Salad Samurai expectedly features a wide variety of flavor-packed, meal-sized salads – expertly organized by season – the book also includes recipe sections for unique dressings; salad “toppers” like spiced nuts, croutons, tofu, tempeh, and seitan; and breakfast “salads” like smoothies, granola, and overnight oats. With this multiplicity of options for salad mixing-and-matching, Terry effectively debunks the myth that salads constitute “rabbit food,” doomed to sad dieting regimens and restricted eating habits. In addition to this impressive recipe array, Salad Samurai also includes a helpful guide to pressing tofu and tips for make-ahead meals for those of us who find ourselves in a rush around mealtime.

Since none of the three recipes I’m sharing with you today call for Terry’s special brand of chia seed dressings, I’d like to make a special note of this genius salad dressing method. While I’m a staunch advocate of oil-full diets (as is The Vegan RD!), Terry introduces the practice of upping the nutrient density of salad dressings without sacrificing that lip-smackingly thick texture that oil lends by substituting chia seeds for a portion of the oil. Not only do the unique gelling properties of chia seeds give the dressings body, they also add important omega-3 fatty acids. Nourishing and delicious.

grilled kale salad with spicy lentils (1)

My version of the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils

Onto the recipes! Beginning with a salad from the “Spring Salads” section of Salad Samurai, I tried out the Grilled Kale Salad with Spicy Lentils. The salad features crisp, smoky kale and caramelized scallions marinated with coconut milk and lime juice, layered on top of a texturally fascinating mixture of smooth lentils, juicy tomatoes, and crunchy almonds, with just enough red onion to provide  a sweet sharpness. Offering an impressive multiplicity of flavors that all complimented one another, this recipes yielded a colorful salad that works well with either grilled or broiled (for those of us without grills; hooray for apartment living!) kale.

smokehouse chickpeas n' greens salad (5)

Book photo of Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Continuing my recipe experimentation by moving onto the “Summer Salads” section, I recreated perhaps the most prized salad from my reviewing duties: the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad. Somehow managing to strike a balance between rich and deeply flavored yet light and bright, this salad features some of my absolute favorite ingredients, including liquid smoke, maple syrup, smoked paprika, and avocado. The salad calls for pan-roasting the chickpeas for a supremely crispy texture before coating them in a simple homemade barbecue sauce and sprinkling them with nutritional yeast. Those snack-worthy morsels get piled on top of a generous helping of greens, red onion, cherry tomatoes, carrots, and avocado, all tossed in a smoky-sweet paprika dressing that I would happily drink.

smokehouse chickpeas n' greens salad (4)

My version of the Smokehouse Chickpeas n’ Greens Salad

Finally, I returned to the Spring salads for a taste of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad – a super fresh-tasting take on traditional heavy pad thai that features “noodles” of asparagus created by taking a vegetables peeler to the stalks. Coupled with toothsome rice noodles, marinated & baked tofu bursting with flavor from a marinade of fresh lemongrass, tons of fresh herbs, a caramelized shallot-lime dressing, and toasted peanuts, the asparagus noodles form a salad that truly showcases Terry’s ability to expertly combine flavors and textures.

zucchini pad thai (3)

My version of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

So as not to leave you with your mouth hanging wide open from all of this tantalizing talk, the publishers of Salad Samurai have graciously offered to let me share with you the full recipe for the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad! Enjoy, and be sure to enter the giveaway to win a copy of Salad Samurai by following the links at the top and bottom of this post.

salad samurai (1)

Book photo of the Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Asparagus Pad Thai Salad

Serves 2.

Pad Thai Salad Ingredients:

4 oz pad thai rice noodles
1/2 lb asparagus
1 cup mung bean sprouts, washed and dried
1 cup lightly packed fresh Thai or sweet basil leaves, chiffonaded
1 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro, coarsely chopped
2 scallions, green part only, thinly sliced
1 batch Lemongrass Tofu (recipe below)
1/2 cup roasted peanuts, coarsely ground
Lime wedges and Sriracha, for serving

Toasted Shallot Dressing Ingredients:

1/4 cup minced shallots
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
1 tbsp vegetable oil
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
2 tbsp coconut sugar or organic brown sugar, plus more for serving
1 tbsp tamarind concentrate
1 tbsp soy sauce, plus more for serving

Boil the rice noodles according to package directions and cook only until al dente (1 or 2 minutes less than directed). Drain, rinse with cold water, and cover with cold water until ready to use.

Wash and trim the tough stem ends from the asparagus. Trim the heads from the asparagus and set aside. Use a Y-shaped peeler to shred the asparagus stalks into long ribbons and slice into thin strips the remaining pieces that are too awkward to shred. Transfer the asparagus ribbons to a mixing bowl and add the mung bean sprouts, basil, cilantro, and scallions.

In a skillet over medium heat, fry the shallots, garlic, ginger, and oil until the shallots are golden brown, about 3 minutes. Add the asparagus tips, saute 1 minute, remove from the heat, and cool for 2 minutes. Transfer the asparagus tip mixture to the bowl with the ribbons. Drain the rice noodles and add the the asparagus salad.

Whisk together the lime juice, sugar, tamarind, and soy sauce and pour over the salad. Toss to coat everything with the dressing. Mound the salad in serving bowls and garnish with strips of Lemongrass Tofu (below) and sprinkle with peanuts. Devour, but graciously offer wedges of lime, Sriracha, a small dish of coconut sugar, and soy sauce for dining companions to season their own dish to taste.

For zucchini noodle pad thai: Replace the rice noodles with homemade zucchini or yellow summer squash for an even lighter dish. You’ll need a little more than 1/2 pound of squash. Use the Y-shaped peeler to create long, thin strands similar to the asparagus “noodles” for the above salad. Proceed as directed.

Plan ahead like a samurai: Prepare the Lemongrass Tofu (below) a day in advance and heat up just before serving.

Lemongrass Tofu

Serves 2 as a salad topping.

Ingredients:

1 pound extra-firm tofu or super-firm tofu (no pressing necessary for the latter)
2 tbsp maple syrup
4 tsp tamari
1 heaping tablespoon finely chopped fresh or prepared lemongrass
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tsp peanut oil or olive oil

If using extra-firm tofu, press the tofu first. Slice the tofu into thin 1/4-inch strips. Preheat the oven to 400°F and coat the bottom and sides of a 13 x 9-inch ceramic or glass baking dish with cooking spray.

Combine the maple syrup, tamari, lemongrass, garlic, and oil in the baking dish and whisk together. Arrange the tofu slices in the marinade and set aside while the oven is preheating, about 15 minutes. Occasionally stir around the tofu strips.

Bake the tofu for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and flip the strips over. Bake another 15 to 20 minutes, until the strips are golden and the marinade is absorbed. Serve warm or chilled. Store chilled and consume within 2 days for best flavor.

From Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romero. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014.

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Thursday, July 25, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

Click HERE to enter the giveaway!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with a free copy of the cookbook. All opinions are completely my own.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-11-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

The sixth installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News features two creative and decadent animal-free recipes for traditionally animal-based dishes (one savory and one sweet); a gorgeously composed salad out of a much-anticipated cookbook; problematic coverage of recent developments in the Israel-Palestine conflict; the racist practices of the National Security Agency; and a book that every food justice advocate should have on their shelf.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Filet O’ Chickpea Sandwich with Tartar Sauce Slaw
via Keepin’ It Kind

Photo via Keepin' It Kind.

Photo via Keepin’ It Kind.

Kristy’s culinary creativity never ceases to amaze me, and she showcases her talent once again in this summery, sea-inspired sandwich. I’ve found myself on a vegan “seafood” kick lately, craving chickpea “tuna” salad sandwiches and experimenting with vegan smoked salmon from Sophie’s Kitchen in an animal-free, homemade version of bagels and lox. As such, Kristy’s fried chickpea-artichoke patty topped with creamy tartar sauce-coated slaw is supremely exciting my tastebuds. Plus, there’s vegan mayo involved. And man, I love me some vegan mayo.

Sweet

Hazelnut Mousse Parfaits with Strawberries & Pretzels
via Artful Desperado

Photo via Artful Desperado.

Photo via Artful Desperado.

The other night, I had the immense pleasure of dining at V-Note, an all-vegan bistro on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, and reveling in their creamy, silky-smooth, decadent, rich, mind-boggling rendition of tiramisu. The dessert featured coconut cream, coffee-soaked pastry, and chocolate syrup layered in a glass tumbler, parfait-like. Still reeling from the experience of the tiramisu, I feel called to this Hazelnut Mousse Parfait, especially considering my deep adoration of hazelnuts. Paired with salty pretzels and juicy strawberries, this mousse may just pave my path to replicating my tiramisu-induced happiness.

Be sure, of course, to use cocoa included on the Food Empowerment Project’s approved chocolate list to ensure that you don’t contribute to the slave practices of the vast majority of the global chocolate industry.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Raw Cobb Salad
via the Choosing Raw cookbook by Gena Hamshaw

raw cobb salad

I’ve eagerly anticipated the release of my dear friend Gena‘s cookbook for over a year now, and I’m absolutely thrilled to have its physical manifestation gracing my bookshelves today. While you’ll have to wait until later in the summer when my in-depth review of the cookbook will be featured on the Our Hen House podcast, my excitement for Choosing Raw the cookbook overflows such that I feel then need to offer you all a sneak preview. As part of my recipe-testing for the OHH review, I recreated Gena’s Raw Cobb Salad – an expertly composed dish of lettuce drizzled in a creamy, smoky red pepper-cashew dressing, topped with rows of succulent heirloom tomato, buttery avocado, homemade tangy cashew cheese, and crispy eggplant bacon. A rainbow of flavors in a rainbow of a plate.

Must-Read News Article

What Fuels the Violence Against Palestinian and Israeli Youths?
via Counterpunch

Mourners carry the bodies of fighters Osama al-Hosomi and Mohammed Fasih during their funeral in Gaza City, 27 June. The two were killed and a third was wounded in an Israeli air strike. Photo via Ashraf Amra, APA Images, Electronic Intifada.

Mourners carry the bodies of fighters Osama al-Hosomi and Mohammed Fasih during their funeral in Gaza City on June 27. The two were killed and a third was wounded in an Israeli air strike. Photo via Ashraf Amra, APA Images, Electronic Intifada.

While heated for years now, the Israel-Palestine conflict has received considerable media attention in the past week due to the murder of three Israeli teenagers in occupied Palestinian land. Problematically, however, the coverage of this event has largely failed to mention Israel’s 60-year campaign of occupation against the Palestinians, as well as the collective punishment that Israel has unleashed upon the Palestinian population. Such punishment has included destroying Palestinian homes, farms, and Mosques; abducting over 600 Palestinians; and bombing the people of Gaza with 34 air strikes in one night. This article from Counterpunch fleshes out the pro-Israel media coverage surrounding these events, as well as speculates upon what drives Israel’s abuse of the Palestinian people.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Spied on for Being Muslim? NSA Targets Named in Snowden Leaks Respond to U.S. Gov’t Surveillance
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

This week, the newly launched NSA-whistleblowing site The Intercept published a lengthy investigative report based upon documents leaked by Edward Snowden that identify five prominent Muslim Americans spied on by the National Security Agency. Glenn Greenwald, a founding editor of The Intercept, joins the Democracy Now! team to discuss how “the only thing [the five spied-on individuals] really had in common is that they are all politically active American Muslims. And that seems to be enough in the intelligence community to render these people suspicious.”

Also in the segment, Democracy Now! airs a video from The Intercept of Nihad Awad, the executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the country’s largest Muslim civil rights group. Nihad responds to the government surveillance he experienced:

“I was not aware that I was under surveillance, except recently. And I’m outraged that as an American citizen, my government, after decades of civil rights struggle, still the government spies on political activists and civil rights activists and leaders. It is outrageous, and I’m really angry that despite all the work that we have been doing in our communities to serve the nation, to serve our communities, we are treated with suspicion.”

Wonderful coverage of a hugely important report revealing the intensely racist practices of the U.S. government.

Book Recommendation

Stuffed and Starved
by Raj Patel

Photo via IndieBound.

Photo via IndieBound.

I would call Raj Patel’s book Stuffed and Starved a must-read for anyone involved in or concerned with the global food justice movement. The captivatingly written book recounts Patel’s investigation into food systems around the world, uncovering the reasons behind famines in Africa and Asia, the rampant poverty of farmers in Latin America due to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and more. In doing so, Patel clearly displays that the enormous power of controlling the global food system lies in the hands of just a few wealthy corporations and governments. Once you pick this book up, you honestly will not want to put it down (nor should you!).

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-4-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy 4th of July! While the news highlighted in this fifth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News may not contribute to your patriotism, July 4th still provides a fabulous excuse to fire up the grill for some summer veggies and dig into a pint of non-dairy ice cream. Let’s get to it!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Strawberry Sweet Rolls with Lemon-Caramel Glaze
via Yup, It’s Vegan

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Photo via Yup, It’s Vegan.

Though the end of strawberry season is upon us in Brooklyn (hellooo, cherries!), Shannon offers up a chewy, yeasty, doughy, succulent, mouthwatering recipe to make creative use (not that eating them unadorned isn’t a fabulous use) of any late-season strawberries you might be lucky enough to snag. I expect that these whole-grain, refined sugar-free sweet rolls would provide both a comforting breakfast and a lovely warm-weather dessert, perfect for enjoying on the patio just before sunset.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Ranch Potato Salad, Buffalo Tempeh with Homemade Sauce, and Sweet Kale Salad
via Betty Goes Vegan, Post Punk Kitchen, Emeril Lagasse, and Chef Mickiyah

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The “recipe” highlight of this week is actually a full meal made up of three components. The first: a Ranch Potato Salad with sweet green peas and a vegan ranch dressing adapted from the vegan-Betty Crocker remix cookbook Betty Goes Vegan. The second: crispy sauteed tempeh simmered in homemade buffalo sauce, inspired by Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s recipe with a DIY twist. The third: a warm salad of wilted kale in a succulent sauce of Dijon mustard and coconut sugar with a sprinkling of juicy raisins, courtesy of Chef Mickiyah of Woodland’s Vegan Bistro (remember my rave review of this DC vegan hot spot last summer?). Hearty, boldly flavored, and nourishing, this dinner would have impressed any July 4th-celebrating non-vegan.

Must-Read News Article

This past week brought an onslaught of landmark court decisions, both inside and outside of the U.S.

canadian-harper-pipeline-protest

Photo via Grist.

Via Grist: In Canada, the Supreme Court ruled that any First Nation land that was never formally ceded to the Canadian government cannot be developed without consent of those First Nations that have a claim to it. In addition to challenging the Northern Gateway oil pipeline that would run from Alberta to China, the ruling recognizes the rights of the First Nations whose land the U.S. and Canada colonized long ago, and who have endured heaps of discrimination ever since. Way to go, Canadian Supreme Court.

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Photo via Slate.

Back home in the U.S., however, the Supreme Court produced decisions much less worth celebrating. Via Slate, Truthout, and Mother Jones: Not only did the Court strike down a Massachusetts law mandating a 35-foot buffer zone that anti-abortion protesters couldn’t enter to heckle patients outside of abortion clinics, it also declared that the government couldn’t require closely held businesses to provide their employees with health insurance that covers types of birth control that offend the owner’s religious beliefs. Both decisions severely infringe upon women’s health and reproductive rights, essentially indicating that corporations constitute “people” more so than do women. A much more sarcastic “way to go” to you, SCOTUS.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

BEST OF: Melissa Gira Grant on sex work, savior complexes, and a vegan dominatrix
via Citizen Radio

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Photo via Citizen Radio.

The topic of sex workers and their rights proves hotly debated, even in feminist circles, as many well-meaning folks attempt to control the actions of women who find themselves in precarious situations and choose to engage in sex work in order to get by. In this “Best Of” episode of Citizen Radio, Melissa Gira Grant—author of Playing the Whore, which is definitely next on my reading list—explains the politics behind the issue of sex workers with elegance, clarity, and wit. A must-listen.

For more information on sex workers’ rights, check out this recent article on Truthout, entitled “Cutting Off Sex Work Advertising Sites Disrupts Communities, Not Trafficking.”

Book Recommendation

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
by Matt Taibbi

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Photo via NPR.

While anyone who hasn’t lived under a slab of tofu for the past few decades has clearly seen the staggering wealth gap into which capitalism has sent our country spiraling, Matt Taibbi highlights the concrete impacts that this gap has upon the bodies of the poor and the criminal justice system. Switching between narrating startling stories of corporate/Wall Street money laundering and the clear discrimination in policing against people of color, Taibbi demonstrates the stark contrast between the treatment of the rich and poor in arrests, trials, and punishments. For example. on the one hand, the police arrest an impoverished Black man for “obstructing traffic” by standing in front of the door of his own home, while “too-big-to-fail” companies like HSBC receive no more than a slap on the wrist for major corporate fraud. A book to make your blood boil and your cynical laughter to ring.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-27-14}

If you haven’t yet already, don’t miss your chance to win two free pints of amazingly decadent, creamy, rich, and delicious vegan ice cream from Luna & Larry’s Coconut Bliss on my latest giveaway!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

This week’s News & Chews (fourth edition!) features the wonders of summery finger foods and artful salads, a roundup of the need-to-know news stories of the past week, a video highlighting the racial politics of a resurfaced court case from the 1980s, and a book that must grace the shelves of anyone even remotely involved in movement organizing.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Peach & Avocado Summer Rolls with Almond Butter Dipping Sauce
from Anya Kassoff’s new “The Vibrant Table,” via Katie at the Kitchen Door

Photo via Katie at the Kitchen Door.

Photo via Katie at the Kitchen Door.

This recipe, from the new cookbook “The Vibrant Table” by Golubka’s own Anya Kassoff, positively bursts with the goodness of summer produce, including juicy peaches, buttery avocados, and bright basil. Accentuated with the crunch of pistachios, the richness of hazelnut oil, and the unctuousness of a lip-smackingly tantalizing almond butter dipping sauce, these summer rolls all but beg to grace my dinner plate.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Salad Niçoise Bento Box
via Terry Hope Romero’s new “Salad Samurai

nicoise salad (3)

 Lucky enough to receive an advanced copy of culinary genius Terry Hope Romero’s new cookbook (look out for a review & giveaway in mid-July!), I spent the last week reveling in fresh, creative, and hearty salads from the mastermind of the co-author of the vegan Bible “Veganomicon.” I don’t want to give away too much about this gorgeous Niçoise salad pictured above, but I will mention its innovative inclusion of coconut “bacon,” avocado “egg,”  and chickpea “tuna” salad. I’m in love.

Must-Read News Article

This past week saw such a proliferation of important news stories (both uplifting and gut-wrenching) that instead of featuring a single article on this week’s edition of News & Chews, I’d like to feature a “round-up” of sorts.
First, the bad news. From Daily Kos, 40 percent of Detroit residents who cannot afford to pay their water bills due to crippling unemployment and other poverty-related factors risk having their water supply cut off. In response, the Detroit People’s Water Board has petitioned the UN to make clear to the U.S. government that it has violated the human right to water. And in further draconian governmental news, from Al Jazeera, an Egyptian court has sentenced two Al Jazeera journalists to seven years in prison and another to ten years, on charges including aiding the Muslim Brotherhood and reporting false news. This ruling has the powerful potential to have a chilling effect on journalists, and represents a serious blow to journalistic freedom.
Luckily, we still have access to multiple outlets for independent journalism, many of which this week featured a number of hopeful stories. From Truthout, the Presbyterian Church, USA sets an exciting precedent in upsetting the power imbalance between Israel and occupied Palestine by divesting from three corporations that have been continually involved in the Israeli population of the West Ban. Meanwhile in Los Angeles, from BuzzFlash, a federal court struck down a municipal ordinance that made it a crime to use a car for overnight shelter, representing a victory against the city’s anti-homeless agenda that seeks to decrease visibility of the issue rather than securing homes for the homeless. Finally, Gerardo Cerdas, coordinator of the transnational social movement Grito de los Excluidos, shares his uplifting views of the future of social movements at Truthout. I would highly recommend this article to anyone interested or involved in movement organizing, especially those who (like myself) have become (more than a bit) jaded.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

NYC’s $40M Central Park 5 Settlement Resolves Wrongful Jailing Fueled by Race-Baiting, Police Abuse
via Democracy Now!

Untitled

Those of us born in the 1990s may have missed the infamous case of the Central Park jogger, in which the NYC court system convicted five black and Latino men of raping a female jogger in Central Park, only to be found innocent decades later after the real rapist came forward and confessed. The five convicted men having already served sentences of up to 13 years, the City of New York has finally reportedly agreed to pay $40 million to the wrongfully convicted men. The most notable aspect of this story involves the racial profiling activities of the NYPD, through which young men of color were targeted as significant dangers to society. Additionally, as professor of sociology Natalie Byfield notes, “the significance of a settlement, to me, is important because it starts to undo what became a historic lie. And I say it in this way because the case itself was the launching pad for a transformation of the juvenile justice system.” So many complexities to this story, and an important case to remember in terms of the racial politics of the U.S.

Book Recommendation

Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building Strategy
by Chris Crass

Photo via Racial Justice Allies.

Photo via Racial Justice Allies.

Written by longtime anarchist movement organizer (including with the awesome vegan organization Food Not BombsChris Crass, this book contains an invaluable assortment of reflections upon the history of anti-capitalist organizing in an attempt to learn from past mistakes and advance current movement efforts. From his background as an feminist-informed anti-racist educator of white people, Crass practices self-reflexivity with grace and provides important critiques of the un-discussed privileges and inequalities in past movement efforts. I sincerely hope that this book becomes widely read among activists everywhere.

Until next time, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-20-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Enjoy the sweet raw treats, a unique take on a ubiquitous dip, a local tempeh purveyor, three organizations promoting the accessibility of holistic healthcare, a podcast episode on transgender rights, and feminist modernist literature on the third installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

The vegan blogosphere offered much too many tantalizing recipes in this past week, so I’ve allowed myself to cheat a bit and feature two of my favorite newly published recipes, one sweet and one savory, on this round of News & Chews. Somehow, I don’t think that you, dear readers, will mind.

Sweet
Raw Hazelnut Brownies with Pistachio Cream Topping
via The Vegan Woman

mouthwatering-halva-brownies

Photo via The Vegan Woman.

These gorgeously earth-toned brownies manage to combine my two favorite nuts on earth (the holy hazelnut and the pristine pistachio) in a decadent, nourishing raw dessert that features both silky smooth and crunchy textures. Intriguingly, the brownie base even packs a secret veggie punch—the frequent salad star that this dessert employs backstage will certainly surprise you. An important note: don’t forget to use Food Empowerment Project-approved cocoa powder or, better yet, carob powder in order to avoid supporting the exploitative chocolate trade.

Savory
5-Minute Microwave Hummus
via Minimalist Baker

BEST-EVER-5-Minute-Microwave-Hummus-The-trick-that-gives-you-creamy-restaurant-style-hummus-every-time.-I-cant-sotp-eating-it-vegan-glutenfree

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

While I’m sure that the vast majority of you have consumed your fair share of hummus over the course of your lifetime, I find myself consistently transfixed by recipes that claim to yield the “best hummus ever” due to a unique preparation method. For example, I’ve seen directions to peel each individual chickpea before blending, and to puree the hummus in the blender rather than the food processor (the latter instruction actually did result in some of the creamiest, dreamiest hummus I’d tasted in a great while). This particular hummus, promised as “the best” by a blog that I find to be a quite reputable source, suggests microwaving the chickpeas in their cooking or canning liquid together with whole cloves of garlic before pureeing the mixture with a generous helping of tahini. Well folks, I’m preliminarily convinced, and I look forward to experimenting with this new hummus method.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Chipotle Citrus Tempeh & Broccoli with Barry’s Brooklyn Tempeh
adapted from Vegan Richa

Photo via Vegan Richa.

Photo via Vegan Richa.

This hearty one-dish meal has caught my eye nearly every time I’ve scrolled through my extensive “Recipes to Try” Word document, and the fresh broccoli at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket last Saturday finally spurred me to make it. A pleasing harmony between sweet and spicy, the sauce packs a flavor punch with freshly squeezed orange juice and chipotles in adobo. Even better, the sauce employs a starch (I used arrowroot) to achieve a sticky texture that coats the broccoli and tempeh in glossy goodness.

While the complexity and viscosity of the sauce verily impressed me, the highlight of this dish doesn’t even make an appearance in the original recipe. Indeed, Barry’s tempeh (local to Brooklyn) outshined all of the ingredients and the sum of their parts; I found myself forking around the broccoli for all of the crispy-fried cubes of naturally sweet, chewy Azuki Bean & Brown Rice Tempeh (one of four unorthodox flavors of Barry’s). If you’re lucky enough to live in the NY area, I’d highly recommend that you get your tempeh-loving paws on some Barry’s.

 Must-Read News Article

by Liz Pleasant, via Truthout
Photo via the Healing Clinic Collective.

Photo via the Healing Clinic Collective.

I recently featured the amazing work of activist and yogi Becky Thompson on the ol’ blog, and the initiatives highlighted in this article over at Truthout certainly align with Becky’s important mission of making yoga and other forms of powerful holistic healing accessible to all, regardless of race or class. The article features the commendable groups the Healing Clinic Collective (an Oakland-based organization that hosts events with free holistic healthcare, and offers discounted rates for future appointments), the Third-Root Community Health Center (a Brooklyn-based project that provides holistic health services at a sliding-scale rate, and reaches out to low-income communities), and the Samarya Center (a Seattle-based group that uses the profits from its yoga studio to bring physical therapy to impoverished communities). In my view, these sorts of collective, accessibility-generating endeavors form the base of a robust movement against our destructive and unequal capitalist system. Check out these organizations for some real hope.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Janet Mock on transgender rights, Mychal Denzel Smith on war, Tupac, and Ninja Turtles
via Citizen Radio

Citizen Radio hosts Jamie Kilstein & Allison Kilkenny with Janet Mock. Photo via Citizen Radio.

Citizen Radio hosts Jamie Kilstein & Allison Kilkenny with Janet Mock. Photo via Citizen Radio.

When it comes to discussing and acting upon social issues, so often transgender equality gets excluded and ignored, even by so-called LGBT organizations (where’s consideration for the “T,” people?!?). This exclusion becomes particularly troublesome when considering the fact that individuals of trans experience—especially those who are also women of color—deal with intense physical and systemic violence on a daily basis.

In this interview with powerhouse activist and author of Redefining Realness, Janet Mock discusses these issues and more with the hilarious duo of progressive radio Jamie Kilstein and Allison Kilkenny. The most striking moment in the interview for me came when Janet touched upon “safe spaces,” the notion that we can carve out spaces within communities, groups, organizations, etc. in which individuals of all backgrounds and experiences can feel safe expressing their viewpoints without fear of marginalization. Of safe spaces, Janet offers these important thoughts:

“These spaces, even though they’re supposed to be welcoming, safe spaces, they still are infected by the ills that all other spaces are —racism and misogyny and elitism and classism, academia jargon and all of this stuff. These spaces aren’t immune. If you come into these spaces knowing that, then your job is to come in and make it a better space.”

We can’t just assume that because we define a space as “safe,” that oppression can’t happen within that space. With this in mind, we must work to consciously and meaningfully honor the voices of those most often marginalized.

Book Recommendation

To the Lighthouse
by Virginia Woolf

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This week, I found myself with a work of fiction in hand—one authored by one of the greatest modernist writers of the 20th century. Though I usually prefer to examine social issues directly through critical non-fiction, sometimes I find it refreshing to engage with the profound ideas that concern our modern world (in this case, feminism and gender inequality) through a filter of gorgeously crafted sentences and expertly developed characters. Enter Virginia Woolf, whose To the Lighthouse provides an ideal novel into which to disappear while still confronting the important issues of our (and Woolf’s!) time.

Until next time, Ali.

Brooklyn Restaurant Exploration: Dao Palate + Announcements!

Before I get into today’s post, I’d like to point you toward the latest episode of the Our Hen House podcast, which features highlights from recent interviews on the OHH TV show. In between interviews, you’ll hear the voice of yours’ truly introducing each of the interviewees. Check it out! 

Mariann & Jasmin on the OHH TV show.

I’d also like to announce the two winner’s of the Tastymakes raw, sprouted, vegan, organic, and gluten-free snack box giveaway. Congratulations to Samantha Matons and Theresa Norris! Enjoy your tasty, nourishing treats.

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I’ve hesitated to make this announcement until now, mostly because I’ve found myself in partial disbelief that such an ideal series of opportunities has unfolded before me in the past couple of months, and wanted to make absolutely certain of their reality before I went about publicizing them on the ol’ blog. Now, midway into June, I believe that I can confidently assert that, yes, these dream-worthy experiences legitimately constitute the actuality of my summer.

Without further ado, I’m more than thrilled to announce that this summer, I’m living in Brooklyn, NY, interning with the multimedia hub of animal advocacy Our Hen House, and working part-time for both the vegan publishing house Lantern Books and the public policy action tank on the environment and animal agriculture Brighter Green. Needless to say, I’m honored and humbled to offer my time and energies to these change-making organizations, and I highly encourage you to pop around their websites and get to know their important work.

PicMonkey Collage

In addition to working for three impressive groups, I also feel incredibly privileged to live in one of the most vegan-friendly cities in the country, and as such intend to partake in my fair share of restaurant-hopping. To recount my experiences with Brooklyn’s vegan scene, I’m excited to launch a temporary blog series similar to the DC Restaurant Exploration of last summer. But this time, FMV’s taking on Brooklyn.

My first stop: Dao Palate. A favorite of my Brooklyn-native buddy and his entire non-vegan family, this 100% vegan pan-asian café delights eaters of all persuasions with its wide selection of colorful and unique appetizers, market-fresh local vegetables, hearty entrees that feature some of the tastiest plant-based meat I’ve encountered, and dense, rich cheesecakes. Dao Palate serves up all of these goodies and more in a gorgeous dining room paneled in mahogany wood accentuated with jade green decor and lit naturally through floor-to-ceiling windows. Additionally, I hugely appreciate their speedy service and reasonable prices, which prove impressively proportionate to the amount of food each dish provides (about $5 for an appetizer, $13 for an entree, $9 for a noodle or rice dish, $6 for dessert).

dining room

Dao Palate dining room; photo via Dao Palate.

Ranging from tempura to dumplings to scallion pancakes to avocado tartar to BBQ seitan ribs, Dao Palate’s appetizers prove perfect for sharing with the table. Rather unfortunately named “soy protein” on the menu, the anything-but-unfortunate entrees—which include mango soy protein, General Tso’s soy protein, orange seitan, and smoked teriyaki seitan—feature the most toothsome, substantially textured, and tender vegan meat I’ve ever tasted. And dessert? Look no further than the cheesecakes. Though not quite as impeccable as the cheesecake available at Hangawi, Dao’ Palates thick and creamy creations are available in chocolate, pumpkin, and raspberry white chocolate.

From left to right: Avocado Tartar, Mango Soy Protein, Spinach Shumai; photos via Dao Palate.

From left to right: Avocado Tartar, Mango Soy Protein, Spinach Shumai; photos via Dao Palate.

In addition to nibbles of my dining companions’ dishes, I’ve had the chance to sample two of Dao Palate’s entrees and one dessert.

The first—the bibimbap, served in an always entertaining sizzling stone rice bowl—offered a stunning amalgamation of different tastes and textures, including such components as a brown rice base, a refreshing mango salsa, spicy and crunchy kimchi, a salad of hijiki seaweed and edamame, silky smooth steamed spinach, pleasingly chewy tofu sauteed in teriyaki sauce, and slices of avocado, all tossed in a spicy miso sauce. Full of surprising flavors, this dish could keep any diner happy on multiple visits to Dao Palate.

Bibimbap.

Bibimbap.

Indeed, I almost ordered the bibimbap again during my second excursion to the restaurant, but persuaded myself to try a new dish instead. In the mood for noodles, I opted for the stir-fried soba with julienned vegetables and browned tofu. While I duly appreciated the uniform size and shape of the vegetables and tofu (Dao Palate clearly pays close attention to presentation), as well as the tangy stickiness of the sauce, after a couple of bites the dish became a bit monotonous. The dish certainly didn’t taste bad, but I don’t think that I’d order it again, as it simply ceased to interest me after I had eaten only half of the plate.

Stir-Fried Soba Noodles with Vegetables and Tofu

Stir-Fried Soba Noodles with Vegetables and Tofu

After my less-than-optimal soba experience, I gave Dao Palate a chance to redeem itself with its raspberry white chocolate cheesecake—a dense slice of crumbly crust, oh-so creamy New York-style cheesecake, and tart raspberry jam, topped with swirls of whipped cream. Though the rich texture and characteristically cheesecake-y crust didn’t disappoint, the layer of raspberry and the whipped cream proved much too saccharinely sweet for my palate. I would definitely order a Dao Palate cheesecake again, but perhaps I would opt for the pumpkin flavor instead, in the hopes that it would harbor a more subtle sweetness.

Raspberry White Chocolate Cheesecake

Raspberry White Chocolate Cheesecake

I wholeheartedly plan on returning to Dao Palate in order to get me one of their tantalizing soy protein dishes all for myself, and would certainly recommend this restaurant to anyone upon whom I wish an artfully prepared, hearty, and uniquely flavored meal.

Until next time, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-13-14}

If you haven’t yet, be sure to enter my latest giveaway to win a box of raw, vegan, sprouted, organic, gluten-free snacks from the fabulous folks over at Tastymakes!

Welcome to the second installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News here on Farmers Market Vegan! (Check out the premier post in this weekly series here). This edition brings you delectable springtime recipes, a critical analysis of the hype surrounding the World Cup, the dangers of the escalating cost of higher education, and a book that’s sure to make all you introverts out there (myself SO included) feel all warm and fuzzy inside with validation. Let’s get to it, folks!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Buddha’s Pasta Salad
via Clean Wellness

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Photo via Clean Wellness.

Replete with verdant veggies and aromatic herbs, this creamily dressed pasta salad appeals to all of my springtime culinary sensibilities. Lately, I’ve found myself straight nibbling the stems of fresh mint and chives, but this recipe will certainly put those her s to better use. Though I cringe at the name of Alison’s blog every time I see it (check out this article to see why), I must admit that the woman certainly has some recipe-creating prowess.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Caramelized Oyster Mushroom Scallops over Pasta and Cauliflower with Minted Pea Puree
via Olives for Dinner

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Photo via Olives for Dinner.

I have almost no words for this dish…but then I wouldn’t be very helpful, now would I? This multi-layered, complex, yet cleanly flavored entree featured comforting pasta drowned in a silky puree of sweet peas and refreshing mint, scattered with meltingly tender roasted cauliflower and topped with the pièce de resistance: oh-so-heartily textured, caramelized oyster mushroom “scallops.” The multiple components may intimidate you, but all of them require minimal, simple preparation, and the dish that results from their combination will persuade you to prepare all of them every night…or maybe every meal. I certainly wouldn’t complain.

Must-Read News Article

Photo via Truthout.

Photo via Truthout.

Mainstream coverage of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil has largely overlooked a couple hugely problematic aspects of the event (and of many other mammoth-sized global events, such as the Beijing Olympics): in an attempt to hide rampant poverty and inequality from international eyes, government officials have begun “pacifying” favelas (the “slums” of Brazil), resulting in widespread police abuse. Additionally, the state has spent astronomical amounts on various World Cup expenses, while the millions of Brazilians who live in abject poverty benefit not at all. Important facts to remember among the current World Cup hype.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Is College Worth it? New Doc ‘Ivory Tower’ Tackles Higher Ed’s Unsustainable Spending, Student Debt
via Democracy Now!

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Democracy Now! recently featured an exciting upcoming documentary that discusses the hugely important topic of the ever-increasing cost of higher education. The documentary sheds light on such frightening statistics as:
–The government will make $184 billion off of tuition and student loans this year.
–Since 1978, college tuition has increased by 1120%, more than any other good or service in the U.S.
–Colleges now spend lavishly in order to compete with other institutions, such that some dorms are now built at rates equivalent to construction of luxury hotels.
As a college student, I’m thrilled to see growing attention being paid to this pressing issue, one that threatens to make younger generations beholden to the government for their lifetimes.

Book Recommendation

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking
by Susan Cain

Photo via ThePowerofIntroverts.com

Photo via ThePowerofIntroverts.com

During the last few weeks of the spring semester, I saw a counselor at my college, who after speaking with me informed me that I suffered from social anxiety. Okay, great, my preference for not interacting with large groups of people and my tendency to worry about how I come off in social interactions is now a pathology, and I feel like there’s something terribly wrong with me. This book changed my feelings completely. Like a close friend, this book assured me that my introverted personality does not mark me as broken, but rather bestows upon me the difficult task of navigating a Western culture that privileges extroverts. Author Susan Cain invokes a wide variety of fascinating statistics and psychological studies to shed light upon the strenuous endeavor of living as an introvert in an extroverted society. A necessary read for all introverts and their loved ones.

Until next time, Ali.