Cashew Cheese-Stuffed Fried Squash Blossoms | Restaurant (Review) Closing

Before launching into today’s post and recipe, I’d like to congratulate Melissa Kallick, the winner of my giveaway for a pack of savory, vegan, gluten-free snack bars from Slow Food for Fast Lives!

Back in mid-June, shortly after I had set myself up in Brooklyn for the summer, I published a review of a restaurant in my new neighborhood and promised many more over the course of the next three months. However, on the next occasion I sat down to type up a Brooklyn restaurant review, I stopped myself mid-paragraph and questioned, “Do I really want to post this review on my blog?”

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Why, after offering my take on dozens of vegan-friendly eateries around the world, did I suddenly decide not to do so? I don’t feel comfortable publishing restaurant reviews anymore. Dining at fabulous eateries on a regular basis (or at all) constitutes an enormous privilege afforded to me by my family’s well-off background and my social standing as a non-marginalized individual.

Indeed, if one considers that, after paying rent and taxes, someone who works full-time on the minimum wage enjoys only $77 per week to spend on food and transportation, a single dinner at an average restaurant in New York City would eat up (oh, puns!) about a third of the money that someone has to spend over the course of seven days (i.e., 20 more meals). I imagine that anyone who has experienced this skimpy weekly budget – 3.3 million workers, or 4.3 percent of all hourly paid workers – would not only feel completely unable to identify with me as a person, but would also feel rather offended that I was essentially rubbing in their face the class gap that allowed me to eat at a high-quality restaurant at least once a week while their food choices remained severely constrained.

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As someone who advocates veganism – a lifestyle often associated today with upper-middle-class white folks, and thereby regarded as classist – I seek not to perpetuate the frequently true stereotype of vegans as people focused solely on staying up-to-date on the latest animal-free food trends, waxing poetic about expensive specialty products, and acting in other ways that obscure the heart of veganism: saying no, wherever possible in the contemporary world, to consuming products that rely on animal exploitation (meat, dairy, eggs, honey, fur, leather, silk, animal-tested cosmetics, etc.). While I understand the importance of sharing with not-yet-vegans the wide variety of familiar, veganized foods – both packaged and in restaurants – that make many individual’s transition easier, I feel that relying on these aspects of one form of the vegan lifestyle contributes to the capitalist system that both oppresses marginalized groups everywhere and fuels the animal agriculture industry.

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Veganism is about so much more than the food we eat, no matter how ridiculously delicious it can be, and centering our (and thereby the general public’s) attention on the food to which we have ready access contributes to the perception of a vegan diet as viable only for the most privileged groups of people. I certainly don’t mean to say that we shouldn’t continue to share vegan food with others – I write a blog with plenty of recipes, for goodness sake – but that we should be careful to not present vegan specialty products and restaurant food as the only important aspects of a vegan lifestyle.

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Of course, in addition to this shift in attention, we should support measures to get nourishing food into communities damaged by systemic inequalities, such as community garden initiatives, efforts to minimize food waste, and the programs of such groups as the Food Empowerment Project. Lack of access to healthy food options is also intimately connected to structural racism against which we must unite, though these efforts prove much more complicated and multifaceted. Check out my Resources section to learn more about structural racism and how we might combat it.

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Obviously, my choice to no longer publish restaurant reviews on my blog will not fix the lack of access to nourishing food in low-income communities, nor does it mean that I’ve ceased to play into the classist rhetoric of the current vegan movement. However, I feel that it will comprise a small, semi-symbolic/semi-material step on the path to a less classist vegan movement. If you’re interested in vegan restaurant recommendations in a particular city, check out my Travel section or shoot me a message using my Contact form.

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And anyhow, why take up blog space writing about food I didn’t even make, especially when I and anyone with a bit of practice have the ability to create just as tasty fare? Indeed, it doesn’t take a culinary genius to blend up some cashews into creamy bliss, stuff it inside the flowers that grow on the end of summer’s bounty of zucchini, and fry it all intro crispy morsels of summery yumminess. This recipe represents Italian peasant food at its best – a reminder that the origins of plant-based food lay not with cost-prohibitive items, but with unpretentious produce-centric dishes. Pff, who needs restaurant reviews?

fried squash blossoms (7)

Cashew Cheese-Stuffed Fried Squash Blossoms

Makes 15-20 blossoms.

Ingredients:

1 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours (preferably overnight), drained, and rinsed
1 tbsp sweet white miso
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (about 1 lemons’ worth)
1/2 tsp maple syrup
Pinch of salt
1/4 cup tightly packed fresh tarragon leaves

15-20 fresh squash blossoms, gently rinsed
1/2 cup arrowroot powder or cornstarch
Coconut or vegetable oil for frying

In the bowl of a food processor or the carafe of a high-speed blender, combine all of the cashew cheese ingredients except the tarragon (cashews through salt). Process/blend until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl/carafe as necessary to get everything blending nicely. Once the mixture is smooth, pulse in the tarragon so that it flecks the cheese, rather than turns it green.

Spoon a tablespoon or so into the hollow middle of each blossom, handling the delicate blossoms carefully so as not to tear them. As you stuff the blossoms, lay each one on a large plate.

Place the arrowroot or cornstarch in a medium-sized bowl. Lightly coat each stuffed blossom in the starch, tapping the blossom against the side of the bowl to knock off any excess starch. Lay back on the plate.

Heat over high heat enough oil to cover the bottom of a large-ish skillet with about a 1/2-inch of oil. While the oil heats, place two layers of paper towel on another large plate. Once the oil is very hot and starts crackling (350°F), place half of the stuffed and coated blossoms in the oil. Fry for 2-4 minutes on each side, or until both sides are golden brown, using a tongs to turn the blossoms over. Once the blossoms have finished frying, turn off the heat and carefully transfer them with the tongs to the paper towel-lined plate. Place the skillet back over the heat, and add more oil as needed to bring the level back up to about a 1/2-inch of oil. Fry the remaining half of the blossoms, placing them on the paper towel-lined plate when they’ve finished frying. Serve immediately.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-15-14}

Before launching into today’s post, I’d like to point you toward the giveaway I’m currently running for a free pack of savory, vegan, gluten-free snack bars from Slow Food for Fast Lives, as well as toward my recent review of the eBook series entitled “Socialists and Animal Rights” on Our Hen House

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the 11th installment of Vegan Chews and Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! This one’s recipes feature two items of summer produce that I hold near and dear to my heart, as well as the non-dairy cheese that occupies an equally cherished place…in my stomach. As for news, we’ve got gender norms, the denial of racism, non-military solutions to the situation in Iraq, corporate efforts to privatize education, and the government’s labeling of activists as terrorists. Fun stuff today, folks!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
via Veggie Belly
Photo via Veggie Belly.

Photo via Veggie Belly.

 When summer rolls around, one vegetable that I can’t seem to put into my mouth fast enough is sweet corn. Growing up the in Midwest, I devoured the juicy corn-on-the-cob my mother would boil every week during the warm months, smearing corn bits all over my adolescent face. Naturally, I’ve held the majestic sweet corn dear into adulthood, now chopping it into salads, roasting it in the husk, and pureeing it into soups, but always appreciating its familiarity as a childhood family favorite. This recipe for Masala-Coated Corn, however, introduces a completely new application for my longtime summer veggie pal, coating it in a succulent Indian-spiced tomato sauce. Yes. Yes, please.
Sweet
via My Whole Food Life
Blueberry-Bliss-Bars-My-Whole-Food-Life

I don’t know how the folks at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket grow their blueberries, but whatever they’re doing comprises the work of a genius. I honestly cannot remember ever experiencing plumper, sweeter, and more flavorful blueberries than during my time in Brooklyn this summer. With a mere four ingredients –one of which is the true delicacy of coconut cream –the fudgy bars pictured above would surely showcase the perfection of my Brooklyn blueberries (how’s that for alliteration?).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Broccoli Quesadilla with Avocado, Garlic, and Dill
Adapted from Mountain Mama Cooks

broccoli-avocado quesadilla (2)

During my daily perusing of the latest recipes published in the foodie blogosphere, I tend to bypass those that contain animal flesh and secretions rather than seeking to veganize them. With such a plethora of creative, masterful vegan recipes out there that replicate and far exceed the non-vegan online fare, I see no reason to bookmark the recipes that imply animal exploitation. There exist exceptions to every rule, however, and this verdant quesadilla recipe represents one such exception. Boasting a saute of crisp-tender broccoli and sharp garlic contrasted with the refreshing smoothness of avocado and the slightly sweet note of one of my favorite herbs, the original quesadilla recipe required only a substitute of the king of all non-dairy cheeses on the market (aka, Daiya shredsto provide a veggie-loaded and ooey-gooey vegan entree.

Must-Read News Article

Today I’d like to highlight a pair of articles that touch upon two forms of hegemonic oppression that profoundly affect all of us, though about which most of us remain either unconscious or in denial: gender conformity and white supremacy.

Forcing Kids to Stick to Gender Roles Can Actually Be Harmful to Their Health
by Tara Culp-Ressler at Think Progress

Photo via Shutterstock.

Photo via Shutterstock.

It should come as no surprise that forcing children to conform to an identity with which they don’t actually, well, identify would cause them severe stress and mental anxiety. Indeed, a recent study has confirmed just this intuition, suggesting that the pervasive societal assumption of gender as biological (aka, “natural”) leads to insecurity and low self-esteem in children, who feel the need to exert constant effort to perform in line with established gender norms. Unlike many articles concerning entrenched social issues, though, this one concludes on a hopeful bent, noting that young folks are far less indoctrinated into society’s notions of gender than are older individuals.

We’re Not a Post-Racial Society: We’re an Innocent-Until-Proven-Racist Society
by Danielle Henderson at AlterNet

Photo via AlterNet.

Photo via AlterNet.

Turning to a second hegemony of white supremacy, this article points out with specific examples the general resistance to labeling clearly racist incidents as “racist” (kind of like how only recently did the New York Times promise to start calling torture “torture”). The author astutely attributes this problematic phenomenon to the the promotion in the 1990s of colorblindness, which encouraged whites to pretend not to “see” race, and therefore to deny the existence of racism while at the same time perpetuating it (in the words of Desmond Tutu, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor”). Indeed, if we pretend that racism does not exist, we can not as white folks start to cultivate the anti-racist consciousness necessary in fostering a just society for all.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Two multimedia segments for you today, as well! One on the U.S. intervention in Iraq, the other on the corporatization of the educational system.

As U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq Begin, Will Military Intervention Escalate Growing Crisis?
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

On last Friday’s episode of Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez spoke with Phyllis Bennis, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies who has written extensively on Middle East-U.S. relations and actively opposes the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Recently, Bennis published an insightful piece entitled “Don’t Go Back to Iraq!: Five Steps the U.S. Can Take in Iraq without Going Back to War.” Emphasizing an end to military “solutions” and a collaboration with other nations, Bennis’ piece counters the U.S.’ patriarchal discourse of war as the answer to all of our problems. Bennis discusses the details of her piece and more on this episode of Democracy Now!.

Debunking Ed Reform
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via The Colbert Report.

Photo via The Colbert Report.

Moving to another war – this time the war on public education by conservative self-titled “ed reformers” – John and Molly of Radio Dispatch debunk in detail claims that we must abolish teacher tenure in an effort to improve the performance of schoolchildren. John and Molly explain that standardized testing does not necessarily adequately reflect a student’s capabilities, and that the low-income students performing the worst based upon this standardized testing is largely the result of their poverty, not their teacher’s presumed incompetence. For more on this important discussion, watch the Colbert Report episode with ed reform advocate Campbell Brown that John and Molly reference on the show, as well as a Washington Post article entitled “Fact-Checking Campbell Brown: What She Said, What Research Really Shows.”

Book Recommendation

The Terrorization of Dissent: Corporate Repression, Legal Corruption, and the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act
by Jason del Gandio and Anthony J. Nocella II

Photo via Amazon.com.

Photo via Amazon.com.

I’ll finish today by recommending a book that brings together the government repression of activists (particularly animal and environmental), the privileging of corporate interests, and the shoddy U.S. legal system. Edited by powerful intersectional activists and scholars Jason del Gandio and Anthony J. Nocella II, this anthology contains important essays by intellectuals and prosecuted activists alike that concern the government’s labeling of animal and environmental activists as terrorists (even though these groups have never caused bodily harm to anyone, while white supremacist hate groups run free), the free speech-chilling Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) of 2006, and recent “ag-gag” laws. This November, the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC) (for which I’m honored and humbled to serve a second year as co-president) plans on hosting a campus event week focusing on the topics explored in this book, featuring three of the anthology’s contributors and finishing on Saturday with a discussion that includes numerous activist groups on campus. An important topic for activists of all stripes to explore.

In solidarity, Ali.

Slow Food for Fast Lives Bars Review & GIVEAWAY!

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

I know, I know – the amount of Farmers Market Vegan giveaways this summer has gotten a wee bit out of hand. Somehow, though, I feel that you, dear readers, don’t really mind all of these chances to win free, high-quality vegan products…so what the hey? Howsabout a fifth summer giveaway here on FMV?

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Today I’d like to introduce you to a truly unique line of products from the on-the-go, health-conscious folks over at Slow Food for Fast Lives. Finding themselves with hectic schedules that made sitting down regularly for a nourishing meal quite difficult, the company’s founders – Danny, Mel, and Patricia – combined their appreciation of good food with their desire to provide healthy options for individuals with bustling agendas. With Danny’s innovative idea of launching the market’s first savory snack bar and Mel’s entrepreneurial skills behind her, Patricia employed her imaginative cooking skills in combining farmers’ market produce with nuts, spices, and unrefined sweeteners to create a line of vegetable-based bars in a variety of globally inspired flavors. Not only did these bars far surpass a taste test, they also each contained 1-1.5 servings of veggies and ample amounts of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, calcium, and iron.

slow food for fast lives bars (2)

Since Patricia emerged from her kitchen with that first batch of sumptuous home-cooked bars, Slow Food for Fast Lives has shared its breakthrough products with retailers in California and the Southwest, as well as online, in the hopes of helping busy folks across the U.S. to “eat present, not tense.” While the company’s line currently features four bars – California, Indian, Moroccan, and Thai – the founders constantly have their culinary thinking caps on, perfecting such future flavors as Italian, Japanese, and Mexican. They also eagerly welcome suggestions from consumers on what slow food flavors they’d like to enjoy in their fast lives at info@eattruefoods.com.

While all of Slow Food for Fast Live’s bars are gluten-free and kosher, the California bar does contain honey; the rest of the three are completely vegan! (Check out why I don’t advocate the consumption of honey here.) As such, in this post I’ll only be reviewing the Indian, Moroccan, and Thai flavors.

SFFFL collage 1

I first journeyed into the world of Slow Food for Fast Lives with the Moroccan bar: a vibrantly hued blend of crunchy pistachios, chewy currants, sweet carrots, protein-rich lentils, attractive black sesame seeds, and smooth tahini spiced up with lemon, garlic, ginger, turmeric, and cumin. Featuring hearty chunks of each ingredient instead of constituting a homogeneously blended bar, the Moroccan bar offered a multiplicity of interesting textures mingling with bold flavors. Of the three bars I sampled, I might just prefer the Moroccan bar the most.

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The Thai bar made the next appearance in my Slow Food for Fast Lives tasting tour. Boasting a double whammy of peanuts and peanut butter, crispy brown rice, succulent red bell peppers, and zippy green onions in a bright and spicy mix of lime juice, dried basil, garlic and onion powders, and chiles, the Thai bar definitely got the spice sensors on my tongue all a-tingling. Though I didn’t expect such a pleasant piquant-ness in my snack bar, I found gastronomic memory harkening back to my favorite Thai restaurant in my hometown of Madison, WI after biting into this bar.

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My snack bar trip around the globe ended with the Indian bar – a close second favorite behind the Moroccan bar. Reminding me of a samosa dipped in mango sauce or a coconut curry (but in snack bar form), the Indian bar made supremely savory use of rich cashews and coconut, cauliflower, lentils, hearty potatoes, sweet peas, and buttery mangoes accentuated with tomato powder, turmeric, onion, chili pepper, ginger, and cumin. Redolent with the flavors of curry without being overwhelming, this smooth, chewy bar proves warming and satisfying.

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Have I engaged in enough culinary wordplay to persuade you all to incorporate some slow food into your fast lives? Well, lucky for one of you, the folks at Slow Food for Fast Lives have generously offered to gift a pack of their nourishing, tasty, and inventive bars to a Farmers Market Vegan reader. Simply click on one of the links at the top and bottom of this post, follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter giveaway, and get those fingers crossed. Also be sure to connect with Slow Food for Fast Lives on Facebook and Twitter!

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Sunday, August 17, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with free product samples. All opinions are completely my own.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-8-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy 10th anniversary of Vegan Chews and Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! Exciting, no? Throw some aluminum foil at me! Right? 10th anniversary is aluminum? Anyway… Your jaw will hang wide open at the lavender-spiked grilled cheese sandwich, the creamy green dessert, and the simple yet complexly flavored side dish featured on today’s post. Then, you’ll get your Friday fix of feminism, anti-racism, anti-militarism, and current events. Let’s dive in!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Keepin' it Kind.

Photo via Keepin’ it Kind.

Okay, so this sandwich isn’t necessarily a savory recipe, but that fact certainly does not detract from its ability to make my mouth water after one glimpse of its photo. A huge fan of toasted sandwiches and creamy nut cheeses, this recipe combines two of my gastronomic propensities with my flower of choice: lavender. My past housemate and I share an obsession of sorts with the scent and taste of lavender, though his passion proves so intense that I could smell him walking down the hallway even if the door to my room was closed. Gabe, I would share this sandwich first with you. Though blackberries don’t seem to be in season right now (at least not in Brooklyn), I’m certain that this sandwich would taste just as lovely with raspberries or blueberries.
Sweet
Ethereal Pistachio Mousse
via Clean Wellness
Photo via Clean Wellness.

Photo via Clean Wellness.

I’ve found myself on a rather unstoppable ice cream kick this summer and, judging by my excitement for this recipe, this kick apparently extends to all desserts of the creamy, dreamy, smooth, decadent, delicious, oh my goodness gracious I love ice cream….ahem, persuasion. Anywho, this dessert combines the impeccable texture of creamy desserts with a little green nut that holds a special place in my heart, reminding me of the pistachio gelato over which I swoon whenever I’m lucky enough to return to Italy.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Roasted Scallions, Okra, and Green Beans with Za’atar and Olives
Adapted from Gourmandelle

za'atar veggies with olives

A simple recipe, yet one with enormous flavor. After discovering sumac at the Brooklyn Whole Foods – for which I had been on a quest since last December – I eagerly compiled all of the recipes on my “Recipes to Try” document that featured the brightly flavored seasoning, ubiquitous in Middle Eastern cuisine, known as za’atar (of which sumac is an integral ingredient). The first za’atar-y recipe with which I experimented, this multidimensional side dish pairs the fresh lemon-thyminess of za’atar (homemade with this recipewith the charred succulence of roasted scallions. Since the green beans and okra at my Brooklyn farmers’ market are at peak season right now, I threw a handful of each veggie in with the scallions, yielding fabulous results.

Must-Read News Article

The Problem with Men Explaining Things
by Rebecca Solnit at Mother Jones

Photo via Hypestock/Shutterstock.

Photo via Hypestock/Shutterstock.

I’ve long found myself feeling unimportant, questioning my intelligence and worth, during conversations with many of the men in my life, including those about whom I care very deeply. Feminist scholars like Rebecca Solnit (author of Men Explain Things to Me, which I’d highly recommend) have helped me to realize, name, and understand the origins of this feeling of disenfranchisement that I’ve experienced since childhood when interacting with most men. These feelings arise when, after nearly every mild assertion I make, the man with whom I’m speaking questions it, corrects it, or otherwise explains the correctness of a contrary point. An exhausting feeling to host on a daily basis, I’ve definitely internalized a sense of inferiority when in speaking situations with a male presence. This article by Rebecca Solnit at Mother Jones does a fantastic job of demonstrating the male tendency to explain things (EVERYTHING) to women, and has helped me to start combating that sense of inferiority.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Brennan lies, NYPD misdemeanor arrests are up” and “We tortured some folks
via The Radio Dispatch

John & Molly, hosts. (Photo via The Radio Dispatch.)

John & Molly, hosts. (Photo via The Radio Dispatch.)

John and Molly Knefel, the hosts of The Radio Dispatch podcast, have produced especially tremendous episodes all this week, discussing in an accessible, thoughtful, and entertaining manner the urgent social issues of the moment, such as CIA Director John Brennan lies about his group’s spying on the Senate Intelligence Committee, the perpetual fucked-up-ness of the NYPD, the casual nature of Obama’s admission that the U.S. “tortured some folks,” and, of course, Gaza. These are the podcast episodes in which to immerse yourself on your next run, cooking bout, or evening unwinding time.

Book Recommendation

We Have Not Been Moved: Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21st Century America
Edited by Elizabeth “Betita” Martínez, Mandy Carter, and Matt Meyer

Photo via Amazon.

Photo via Amazon.

This summer, I’ve found myself devouring all the literature on social organizing and feminist/anti-racist/anti-capitalist theory that I can possibly consume. As a burgeoning activist, I see the immense importance of understanding the histories of the movements and issues to which I want to commit myself, as well as their contemporary state and significance. This anthology of essays by prominent anti-racist and anti-war activists writing at various points in the 21st century has greatly contributed to just such an understanding, featuring pieces by late revolutionary organizers and activists at the forefront of today’s struggles alike. An important book for engaging in the important work of linking racism, militarism, and other forms of oppression.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-1-14}

Don’t forget to enter my latest giveaway for your chance to win 4 pints of DF Mavens’ vegan ice cream! Remember, this giveaway is only open to residents of New York City and its five boroughs.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the ninth installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews) here on Farmers Market Vegan! This one will have your mouth watering with intensely flavorful summer dishes that feature heirloom tomatoes and zucchini, along with a dreamy milkshake that offers an homage to the most perfect sweetener on the planet. Then, get ready to have your activist energies inspired with the urge to make the environmental and animal rights movements more inclusive, to combat government surveillance, and to continue the radical energies of a past uprising in my very own hometown.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Alexandra's Kitchen.

Photo via Alexandra’s Kitchen.

Whenever summer rolls around, I rekindle my amorous relationship with zucchini, whose watery texture and insipid flavor during the colder months yields to the succulent smoothness of the warm-weather squash. This verdant side dish from Alexandra’s Kitchen features my preferred preparation of zucchini – caramelized and meltingly tender – alongside a couple of flavors I’ve been craving lately (say hello to my BFFs mint and capers!). This will certainly make an appearance on my dinner table within the coming weeks.

Sweet
Photo via VegaLife.

Photo via VegaLife.

All 21 members of my vegan living cooperative know supremely well of my unwavering devotion to maple syrup – the first substance that comes to my mind when asked, “if you had to sit in a bathtub filled with one thing…” (I’d happily drink myself out of that situation, thank you very much). I’ve also had such a taste for a nice, thick milkshake of late, so this concoction from the folks at Vega fulfills two of my deepest culinary passions of the moment. Plus, what doesn’t experience tremendous improvement from a sprinkling of coconut bacon? Nothing, that’s what.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Grilled Shiitakes and Green Goddess over Heirloom Tomatoes
via the Vedge Restaurant Cookbook

tomatoes & shiitakes w green goddess (1)

I’ve spoken before on the ol’ blog of the wonders of Vedge Restaurant in Philadelphia and its cookbook, and I’m thrilled to once again lend it ample appreciation. This summery dish from culinary genius Rich Landau features thick, juicy slices of heirloom tomato topped with meatily textured and charred shiitake mushrooms, all doused in drizzled with an herby Green Goddess-style dressing of my one true love vegan mayo, plenty of herbs, and capers. Licking the plate is mandatory.

Must-Read News Article

New Report Expounds on Old Problem: Lack of Diversity in Green Groups” and “Think People of Color Don’t Care About the Environment? Think Again
via Brentin Mock at Grist

Photo via Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment.

Photo via Michigan School of Natural Resources and Environment.

In both of these stories, Brentin Mock highlights the problematic lack of inclusion of people of color within the mainstream environmental movement. As he notes, this exclusion proves particularly ironic considering that environmental racism causes communities of color to experience much more intensely the consequences of climate change. For example, Mock cites in the article “a recent study from the University of Minnesota [which] found that black and brown Americans are more often trapped in neighborhoods laden with nitrogen dioxide than their white fellow Americans.”

Of course, people of color don’t currently make up a notable portion of the environmental movement not because they don’t care about the state of our planet, but because of systemic inequalities that, for example, bar people of color from securing jobs in the environmental sector. Additionally, because of the mainstream environmental movement’s overwhelming whiteness, it may not feel like a welcome community for many people of color.

I certainly see this phenomenon present, too, in the animal rights movementa predominantly white movement with racist, classist, sexist, and ableist tendencies. In order to work toward collective liberation for all, regardless of species, race, class, gender, etc., we must confront the oppressions present in the social movements in which we are most involved.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Jeremy Scahill: Leaked U.S. Terrorist Watchlist Rulebook Reveals ‘Global Stop and Frisk Program‘”
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

This Democracy Now! segment features progressive journalists extraordinaire Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux of The Intercept, a recently launched platform dedicated to reporting on the documents provided by NSA whisteblower Edward Snowden and producing “fearless, adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues.” The Intercept’s most recent report focuses on a leaked copy of the secret government guidebook that outlines the characteristics used to classify an individual or group as a “terrorist” target. Democracy Now! lists some of these categorization guidelines:

Both “known” and “suspected” suspects are tracked, and terrorism is so broadly defined that it includes people accused of damaging property belonging to the government or financial institutions. Other factors that can justify inclusion on the watchlist include postings on social media or having a relative already deemed a terrorist.

This guidebook constitutes just one of a plethora of evidence pointing to the creation of a state of complete government surveillance in the U.S.

Book Recommendation

Uprising: How Wisconsin Renewed the Politics of Protest, from Madison to Wall Street
by John Nichols

Photo via Amazon.com.

Photo via Amazon.com.

The other day after stocking up on vegan macarons and Cinnamon Snail doughnuts at the Vegan ShopUp, I hopped a short distance over to Bluestockings, a radical and collectively owned bookstore and activist center (read: my heaven). Not looking for any book in particular, I stumbled upon this book by John Nichols, which caught my eye with its Wisconsin-shaped fist – a symbol I know well from my days as a high school junior in Madison during the ongoing protests against Gov. Scott Walker’s attempt to strip public employees of their collective bargaining rights, and the subsequent occupation of the state capitol. As a youngin’ who lacked a meaningful understanding of class issues and social movements, high-school me didn’t fully understand the pivotal importance of the goings-on of my hometown. This book in part helped me to realize the enormity of all of those marches we students took from our school to the capitol building, those nights spent in sleeping bags on the marble floor of that state building, and the visits of movement leaders like Amy Goodman and Jesse Jacskon to what I thought was my humble city. Now, as I look back on the events of early 2011 in Madison, I’m hugely proud to hail from such a hub of progressivism, and yearn to return to my original community to contribute to the radical energy that helped to shape my current commitment to activism. On Wisconsin!

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-25-14}

Before I dive into today’s post, I’d like to say a huge congratulations to the winner of my Salad Samurai cookbook giveaway: Lydia Greenfield! Thanks to all who entered, and be sure to look out for my next giveaway of the summer.

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

For this eighth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews), revel in hearty and brightly flavored rice paper rolls, oh-so-chewy cashew cookies, the epitome of a summery dinner, stories on climate change and the sure demise of capitalism, accurate coverage (unique among the skewed U.S. mainstream media) of the current situation in Gaza, and an intersectional analysis of the infamous Bill and Lou saga.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Minimalist Baker.

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

 I tend to believe that a dish as simple and difficult to ruin as rice paper rolls don’t merit a recipe, but this one from Minimalist Baker proves unique and mouthwatering enough to make me eat my words (and hopefully one of those rolls…). Though the crispy tofu in particular drew me to the recipe, I can hardly argue with a tangy almond butter dipping sauce or a generous helping of fresh mint and cilantro to offset the recipe’s richness. Recreating this recipe (which I intend to do next week) also provides me with another use for my favorite brown rice paper wrappers.
Sweet
Chewy Cashew Cookies
via Lunchbox Bunch
Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

Photo via Kathy Patalsky.

I’m a gigantic fan of baking with nut flours, due to the rich mouthfeel and tender texture that they impart in scones, muffins, and cookies alike. Not only do these cookies from Kathy Patalsky feature the sweet, ivory-hued flour ground from cashews, they also employ my all-time favorite sweetener: maple syrup. Though making the entire recipe calls for a substantial amount of pretty expensive ingredients, halving the recipe renders the certain joy of these cookies much more accessible.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Zucchini Noodles & Kale in Tomato-Basil Sauce with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes & Portobello-Walnut Balls
adapted from This Rawsome Vegan Life

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This fabulously summery recipe inspired by Emily at Rawsome Vegan Life provides a fresh, complexly flavored, and texturally contrasted take on spaghetti and meat(less) balls that knocked the tiny socks off of my tastebuds. I tweaked Emily’s original recipe a bit by baking the portobello-walnut balls and roasted the tomatoes instead of dehydrating, and adding shredded kale to the zucchini noodles for a kick of green leafies. Even so, Emily’s flavor-combining genius shone through. With succulent and juicy cherry tomatoes, toothsome zucchini noodles coated in a creamy sauce, and meltingly tender portobello balls with a hint of sweetness from the dates, this dish offered me an ideal mid-summer meal.

Must-Read News Article

I’d like to feature four articles this week, grouped into two categories:

The first set of stories centers on climate change, with one from The Nation offering advice from a longtime climate activist on advocacy strategies that I see as helpful to activists of all stripes, and the second from Mother Jones revealing that the most frequent instances of climate denial occur in anglophone countries with strong neoliberal regimes.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Photo via Al Jazeera.

Speaking of everyone’s favorite topic of neoliberal capitalism, the second set of stories offer hopeful views on the future of our economic system. The first story from Al Jazeera suggests that Millennials view capitalism with a heavy does of skepticism, while the second story from Truthout features an interview with sociologist William I. Robinson on the crisis of capitalism. Combined, the two stories provide me with optimism that our up-and-coming generation are poised to finish off the dying remains of capitalism and foster a new, more equitable and just economic system.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Today’s podcast/video recommendation comes as a two-parter, focusing on the increasingly dire state of Gaza thanks to an appalling abuse of power from Israel and its allies (most notably the U.S.). Though Israel proponents continue to insist that the country has a right to defend itself from Hamas’ unsophisticated rockets, they refuse to acknowledge the history of Israel’s occupation of Palestine and the enormous disparity in economic, military, and political power that has resulted.

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

I’d first like to point you toward an episode of the Radio Dispatch podcast, in which John and Molly call out the U.S. media’s “spectacular failure” in covering Israel’s attacks on Gaza (I mean, NBC misled viewers to believe that the scenes of Gazan destruction they showed took place in Israel, for goodness’ sake).

Thankfully, progressive news outlets like Democracy Now! have provided far more truthful (read: unsullied by a desire to conform to the U.S. government’s status quo) coverage of the current situation in Gaza. Indeed, Democracy Now! has devoted most of its air time over the past week to highlighting the voices of those on the ground in Gaza and those for justice in Palestine, including correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous, the executive director of a Gaza hospital shelled by Israel, an NBC veteran reporter pulled from Gaza after accurately reporting on the situation, members of Jewish Voices for Peace arrested for protesting an organization that raises money for the Israel Defense Forces, and MSNBC’s sole Palestinian voice Rula Jebreal who faces persecution for publicly criticizing her own network’s coverage of the Israel-Palestine conflict. These clips from Democracy Now! clearly demonstrate the horrifyingly skewed coverage by U.S. mainstream media of the current Gaza situation.

Book Recommendation

The Oxen at the Intersection: A Collison
by pattrice jones

Photo via Lantern Books.

Photo via Lantern Books.

I’ve long supported the work of pattrice jones, the fierce intersectional activist and co-founder of VINE Sanctuary, and cannot recommend more highly her most recent book. Part retelling of the Bill and Lou saga; part analysis of its historical, sexist, racist, and ableist components; and part suggestions of what animal advocates can learn from the controversy, pattrice with characteristic fearlessness provides a work of huge value to anyone involved or interested in intersectional activism. A short and accessible read, this book took me all of two days to finish, and I found myself enthralled in every moment. An absolutely fascinating read.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {7-4-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy 4th of July! While the news highlighted in this fifth edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News may not contribute to your patriotism, July 4th still provides a fabulous excuse to fire up the grill for some summer veggies and dig into a pint of non-dairy ice cream. Let’s get to it!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Strawberry Sweet Rolls with Lemon-Caramel Glaze
via Yup, It’s Vegan

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Photo via Yup, It’s Vegan.

Though the end of strawberry season is upon us in Brooklyn (hellooo, cherries!), Shannon offers up a chewy, yeasty, doughy, succulent, mouthwatering recipe to make creative use (not that eating them unadorned isn’t a fabulous use) of any late-season strawberries you might be lucky enough to snag. I expect that these whole-grain, refined sugar-free sweet rolls would provide both a comforting breakfast and a lovely warm-weather dessert, perfect for enjoying on the patio just before sunset.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Ranch Potato Salad, Buffalo Tempeh with Homemade Sauce, and Sweet Kale Salad
via Betty Goes Vegan, Post Punk Kitchen, Emeril Lagasse, and Chef Mickiyah

dinner

The “recipe” highlight of this week is actually a full meal made up of three components. The first: a Ranch Potato Salad with sweet green peas and a vegan ranch dressing adapted from the vegan-Betty Crocker remix cookbook Betty Goes Vegan. The second: crispy sauteed tempeh simmered in homemade buffalo sauce, inspired by Isa Chandra Moskowitz’s recipe with a DIY twist. The third: a warm salad of wilted kale in a succulent sauce of Dijon mustard and coconut sugar with a sprinkling of juicy raisins, courtesy of Chef Mickiyah of Woodland’s Vegan Bistro (remember my rave review of this DC vegan hot spot last summer?). Hearty, boldly flavored, and nourishing, this dinner would have impressed any July 4th-celebrating non-vegan.

Must-Read News Article

This past week brought an onslaught of landmark court decisions, both inside and outside of the U.S.

canadian-harper-pipeline-protest

Photo via Grist.

Via Grist: In Canada, the Supreme Court ruled that any First Nation land that was never formally ceded to the Canadian government cannot be developed without consent of those First Nations that have a claim to it. In addition to challenging the Northern Gateway oil pipeline that would run from Alberta to China, the ruling recognizes the rights of the First Nations whose land the U.S. and Canada colonized long ago, and who have endured heaps of discrimination ever since. Way to go, Canadian Supreme Court.

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Photo via Slate.

Back home in the U.S., however, the Supreme Court produced decisions much less worth celebrating. Via Slate, Truthout, and Mother Jones: Not only did the Court strike down a Massachusetts law mandating a 35-foot buffer zone that anti-abortion protesters couldn’t enter to heckle patients outside of abortion clinics, it also declared that the government couldn’t require closely held businesses to provide their employees with health insurance that covers types of birth control that offend the owner’s religious beliefs. Both decisions severely infringe upon women’s health and reproductive rights, essentially indicating that corporations constitute “people” more so than do women. A much more sarcastic “way to go” to you, SCOTUS.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

BEST OF: Melissa Gira Grant on sex work, savior complexes, and a vegan dominatrix
via Citizen Radio

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Photo via Citizen Radio.

The topic of sex workers and their rights proves hotly debated, even in feminist circles, as many well-meaning folks attempt to control the actions of women who find themselves in precarious situations and choose to engage in sex work in order to get by. In this “Best Of” episode of Citizen Radio, Melissa Gira Grant—author of Playing the Whore, which is definitely next on my reading list—explains the politics behind the issue of sex workers with elegance, clarity, and wit. A must-listen.

For more information on sex workers’ rights, check out this recent article on Truthout, entitled “Cutting Off Sex Work Advertising Sites Disrupts Communities, Not Trafficking.”

Book Recommendation

The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
by Matt Taibbi

9780812993424_custom-ba58a9cf1305ca65bf6412ab0b014064c6b49cf6-s2-c85

Photo via NPR.

While anyone who hasn’t lived under a slab of tofu for the past few decades has clearly seen the staggering wealth gap into which capitalism has sent our country spiraling, Matt Taibbi highlights the concrete impacts that this gap has upon the bodies of the poor and the criminal justice system. Switching between narrating startling stories of corporate/Wall Street money laundering and the clear discrimination in policing against people of color, Taibbi demonstrates the stark contrast between the treatment of the rich and poor in arrests, trials, and punishments. For example. on the one hand, the police arrest an impoverished Black man for “obstructing traffic” by standing in front of the door of his own home, while “too-big-to-fail” companies like HSBC receive no more than a slap on the wrist for major corporate fraud. A book to make your blood boil and your cynical laughter to ring.

In solidarity, Ali.

Seaweed & Edamame Salad | Thoughts on Vegan Privilege

Before introducing today’s recipe, I’m thrilled to announce the three winners of my most recent giveaway for two free pints of Luna & Larry’s Coconut Bliss vegan ice cream. Congratulations to Becca FergusonRosie Riccio DeRensis, and Megan Digeon! Enjoy the creamy, decadent, coconutty goodness.

I got myself into a Facebook skirmish the other day. I don’t often do so, nor do I know that I can even call this incident a “skirmish,” so much as an instance of me replying to a post I found problematic, and never hearing back from the poster or commentators. The post in question—entitled “Dear White Vegans: This is Your Collection Agency Calling“—elicited enthusiastic responses from two individuals who referred to themselves as “former white, privileged vegans.”

seaweed & edamame salad (1)

I responded as such:

“I agree with many of the sentiments expressed in this article. The current vegan movement contains an onslaught of classist, racist, sexist, and ableist elements. Equating the mass slaughter of animals with genocide and slavery co-opts the unknowable suffering of marginalized peoples in an effort to further another movement.

However, I feel that the arguments expressed in this article are a bit ad-hominem. Yes, the way veganism at large is being executed right now is hugely problematic. But at its core, veganism, for me, is simply an extension of an effort to combat the multiplicities of oppression in this world. The exploitation of people of color, women, members of the LGBT community, non-human animals, etc. are not the same, but they share a similar component: an unequal relationship between oppressor and oppressed. I would argue that if this relationship exists anywhere, the possibility for a liberated society becomes greatly hindered.

Consider the powerful activists in history who were also vegan: Cesar Chavez, Thich Nhat Hanh, Coretta Scott King, Angela Davis, and so on. They recognized that while different instances of oppression are not at all the same and each need to be understood in their own right, they are also intimately connected by their being perpetuated by a capitalistic, patriarchal, colonial mindset. To fight against these marginalizing power relations, I feel that we must engage in a multiplicity of social struggles in order to empower habitually silenced groups. And I would argue that these struggles should include non-human animals.”

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In essence, I don’t want to throw out the idea of veganism simply because its current execution involves a multiplicity of problematic aspects. Instead, since I’m currently privileged enough to enjoy access to a bounty of plant-based foods, an income to obtain such foods, and a social circle that won’t disown my non-mainstream lifestyle, I’ve passionately added animal exploitation to the list of oppressions I’m actively seeking to combat by leading a vegan lifestyle.

Equally important, however, is that in such a privileged position, I must also engage in actively combating the problematic aspects of the vegan movement, in part by constantly reminding myself that the privilege enabling my vegan lifestyle exists among the phenomena that I actively seek to combat. The actions I’m taking against such privilege don’t involve giving up veganism, since that would actively enforce another very real oppression. Instead, the actions involve supporting admirable organizations like Food Not Bombs and the Food Empowerment Project that work to make nourishing vegan options accessible to marginalized communities; working to free myself of the capitalistic mindset of nonstop accumulation of material goods; working not to reinforce my various privileges in my daily interpersonal relations; and educating myself about the histories and current manifestations of various oppressions by devouring anti-racist, feminist, anarchist, etc. literature and following progressive news sources.

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These efforts don’t stop my occupation of a privileged position, of course. I’m still able to take myself out for expensive dinners at upscale restaurants in Manhattan; I’m still able to host giveaways on the ol’ blog for free products while the vivacious homeless man, who hangs out most days on the bench in front of my apartment building, asks for donations; I’m still able to shell out $12.99 for a 6-oz bag of arame seaweed at Whole Foods.

But these privileges don’t exist because I’m vegan, and they’ll still exist even if I were to throw up my hands and give up veganism tomorrow (which I absolutely will not). They exist because I’m a white, straight, cisgender individual with an upper-middle-class background. And veganism is only the first way in which I hope to engage in a challenge to the capitalist, patriarchal, colonial, speciesist, etc. society that makes it super easy to thrive with such identity factors.

Now, before I recommence all this challenging, please excuse me while I enjoy the following salad that I made with a $12.99-bag of arame seaweed that I bought at Whole Foods after being inspired to make such a salad by a dish I enjoyed at a not-inexpensive restaurant in perhaps the most well-off neighborhood in Brooklyn. Don’t we all love a good contradiction?

seaweed & edamame salad (1)

Seaweed & Edamame SaladNut Free, Low Sodium, Low Fat.

Serves 2-4 as a side dish.

Ingredients:

3 oz arame or hiziki seaweed (or a blend of the two)
1 cup frozen, shelled edamame
1/2 tbsp coconut oil
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tbsp maple syrup
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp tamari
2 tbsp finely sliced scallions
2 tbsp sesame seeds (both white & black are fine)
1 tsp toasted sesame oil

Place the seaweed in a large bowl and cover with cold water. Let the seaweed soak for 15-60 minutes, or until it has expanded significantly. Drain.

Meanwhile, bring a small pot of water to a boil. Add the shelled edamame and boil for 4-6 minutes. Drain.

When the seaweed has finished soaking, heat the coconut oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and saute for a minute, then add the drained seaweed and saute for about 10 minutes, or until most of the liquid has evaporated from the seaweed. Add the rest of the ingredients except for the toasted sesame oil, raise the heat to medium-high, and saute until most of the liquid has evaporated. Turn off the heat and relocate the seaweed mixture to a medium-sized bowl. Stir in the toasted sesame oil. Chill in the refrigerator for at least an hour before serving.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

Until next time, Ali.

TastyMakes Raw Organic Snacks Review & GIVEAWAY!

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

Get ready, dear readers, for a summer of exciting giveaways on Farmers Market Vegan! I have quite a few of these super fun product raffles up my sleeve for the next three months, so I do hope that you’ll keep a close eye on the ol’ blog amidst all of your warm-weather frolicking.

The first of these giveaways comes from the generous folks over at Tastymakes—a fabulous new snack company that specializes in raw, sprouted, organic, and ethically sourced savory crackers, sweet “barbites,” and crunchy granola clusters. Compelled to share the benefits of a raw, vegan diet with others after healing from a bike injury through alkaline eating, Tastymakes co-founder Melissa Lacitignola has joined with her husband and a professional raw foods chef to make her dream a reality. As if that story weren’t inspiring enough, TastyMakes also donates 5% of all its profits to anti-hunger organizations. Can you say “socially responsible company”?

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Not only do the folks at Tastymakes offer top-quality raw snacks, they also run a snack box subscription program through which customers can receive various amounts of crackers, barbites, and granolas each month. Arriving like clockwork every month with free shipping, these TastyBoxes ensure a pantry consistently stocked with energizing, nourishing snacks.

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Melissa and her team were kind enough to send me a couple product samples: one bag each of their Salt & Vinegar Crackers, Garden Herb Crackers, and Vanilla Nut BarBites. All of the snacks boasted a short list of hugely wholesome ingredients as well as an enormous punch of flavor.

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The Salt & Vinegar Crackers (the ingredients in which include apple cider vinegar, sprouted golden flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, and sea salt) sported a supremely crunchy texture that dissolved pleasingly on the tongue as a hit of flavor spread through the entire mouth. These crackers will make you guffaw in disdain of those outdated salt & vinegar potato chips, whose muted flavor could never hope to stand up to that of these intensely savory crackers.

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The Garden Herb Crackers (the ingredients of which include sprouted golden flaxseed, sunflower seed, pumpkin seed, rosemary, thyme, sea salt, onions, and garlic) held a firmer texture than did the Salt & Vinegar Crackers, providing more heft for optimal dippability. Indeed, I enjoyed these fresh-tasting crackers spread with a pea puree and fresh almond milk ricotta from Kite Hill—not bad for a rough-and-tumble dinner, if I do say so myself.

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The Vanilla Nut Bar Bites (the ingredients of which include dates, walnuts, cashews, sprouted Spanish almonds, vanilla extract, flaxseed meal, and sea salt) offered a super intense vanilla flavor, coupled with a texture perfectly balanced between chewy and crunchy. I also found that these bites provided ample versatility, able to function not only as an ideal energy-packed snack, but as a premade crust for raw desserts! Check out the recipe below to see what I’m talkin’ ’bout.

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Mini Lemon-Ginger Cheesecake Cups—Raw, Soy Free, Low Sodium

Makes 8 mini cups.

Ingredients:

16 TastyMakes Vanilla Nut Bar Bites
1 cup raw cashews, soaked at least 2 hours and drained
1/2 cup coconut oil (use this lemon-ginger flavored coconut oil for more of a kick!)
1/3 cup coconut or agave nectar (or maple syrup, if you’re not concerned about the cakes being fully raw)
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger

Cut a sheet of plastic wrap about double the size of your 8-piece mini muffin tin. Spread the sheet over the tin and press the plastic wrap into each of the 8 cups to line them.

Take two Vanilla Nut Bar Bites and mush them together into one larger bite. Press the new bite into the bottom of one of the 8 cups. Repeat with the remaining 14 Vanilla Nut Bar Bites.

In the bowl of a food processor or the carafe of a high-speed blender, combine the soaked and drained cashews, coconut oil, coconut nectar or maple syrup, lemon juice, and ginger. Puree until very smooth. Fill each of the Nut Bar Bite-lined mini muffin cups to the brim with the cashew puree. Stick the entire mini muffin tray into the freezer and allow the cheesecake cups to set for about an hour. Remove each of the cups from the freezer about 5-10 minutes before you’d like to enjoy them.

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If that tantalizing recipe isn’t enough to get you ecstatic about this giveaway, I don’t know what will. Those of you that are ecstatic, though, have the chance to win your very own TastyBox! Simply click the links at the top or bottom of this post to enter the giveaway. Good luck!

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Sunday, June 15, and I will ann0unce the two winners on the following day.

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with free product samples. All opinions are completely my own.

Until next time, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {6-6-14}

My blog proudly touts the tagline, “Kale and chickpeas with a side of social justice.” Lately, though, I feel that the scales of FMV have tipped toward the “kale and chickpeas,” and I’d like to afford the “side of social justice” a bit more weight. In light of this desire, I’ve decided to experiment with a new feature of the blog that I’ve deemed “Vegan Chews & Progressive News.”

Every Friday morning, I plan to publish a post that shares with you, dear readers, an amalgamation of the best of two worlds about which I care immensely: artful vegan food, and progressive discussion of social issues. Spreading the word about both of these worlds, I feel, proves necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

To start, each Chews & News post will include:
1.) My favorite newly published recipe—a vegan recipe published over the course of the concluding week that I feel encapsulates the creativity, innovation, and abundance of animal-free eating.
2.) The best recipe I made this weeka vegan recipe (either from a blog or a cookbook) that graced my own kitchen during the week, and that significantly wowed my gastronomic sensibilities.
3.) One or two must-read news articles—articles from progressive news outlets that I feel provide important insights and outlooks on prevalent news stories and/or social issues.
4.) My favorite podcast episode/segment—an excerpt or full episode from one of my favorite podcasts (or television news shows) that I feel accomplishes the same task as the must-read news articles.
5.) A book recommendation—during the summer, I finally find the time to devote to reading for pleasure (an endeavor not frequently accomplished during the school year). Most of the books I enjoy nowadays I feel provide valuable social commentary, and I’d love to share the titles with you all.

Without further ado, the first installment of Vegan Chews & Progressive News!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

 Coconut Rosewater Ice Cream
Via Wholehearted Eats

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Photo via Wholehearted Eats.

Sophie offers a recipe for thick and smooth coconut milk ice cream, cutting its richness with a floral and uplifting note of rosewater—sounds ideal as spring ends and summer emerges. Even better, Sophie offers alternatives for making the recipe if you don’t have an ice cream machine handy (one day…).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

 Mess O’ Peas
Via Peter Berley’s “The Modern Vegetarian Kitchen

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This oh-so-simple side dish combines the fresh tastes of spring—snap peas, sweet English peas, scallions, and mint—with the butteriness of coconut oil to yield a light yet unctuous dish into which your tastebuds can almost melt. Ah, divine simplicity of fresh produce.

Must-Read News Article

Our Words Are Our Weapons: The Feminist Battle of the Story in the Wake of the Isla Vista Massacre
by Rebecca Solnit, via Truthout

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Photo via Truthout.

Author of “Men Explain Things to Me” Rebecca Solnit critiques the mainstream media’s attempt to frame the recent Isla Vista massacre as based solely in either mental illness and lack of gun control, when Elliot Rogers’ lengthy manifesto clearly indicates that the act was one of misogyny. She uses this event and the ensuing #YesAllWomen hashtag as jumping-off points to discuss the importance of language in furthering women’s liberation, pointing toward the feminist movement’s historical coining of terms like “sexual harassment” and “rape culture”—terms that have helped us to identify problems that previously had no names, and were therefore difficult to discuss. An important perspective on the discussion surrounding the Isla Vista massacre.

Favorite Podcast Episode/Segment

Elites Would Like You to Shut Up
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via the New York Times.

Photo via the New York Times.

Brother and sister podcasting duo John and Molly Knefel comment extensively upon Frank Bruni’s recent New York Times op-ed that basically critiques anyone but him for providing commentary on current news stories. John and Molly astutely note that Bruni’s piece is indicative of a broader culture of the unwillingness of social elites to allow the 99% any input in the framing of our world.

Book Recommendation

Green is the New Red: An Insider’s Account of a Social Movement Under Siege
by Will Potter

Photo via Green is the New Red.

Photo via Green is the New Red.

Longtime journalist and animal rights activist Will Potter documents the American government’s crackdown on environmental and animal rights organizations, focusing primarily on the labeling of such groups as “terrorists” even though the vast majority of their crimes have involved no human or animal injuries or casualties. Potter points out that the primary targets of this government crackdown have been organizations that threaten corporate profits, and that government agencies openly express their desire to protect financial interests. This explains why the government is allocating considerable resources toward investigating vegan potlucks rather than legitimate hate groups. An I think necessary read for any activist.

Until next time, Ali.