Vegan Chews & Progressive News {11-21-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Hello, all, and welcome to the 25th anniversary of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)On this chilly Friday, I’ve got three recipes that breathe new life into classic comfort and warm-weather food favorites. Then, we’ll take a look at two instances of insidious white supremacy functioning in very different venues, and a newly launched intersectional vegan zine that I want to distribute on every sidewalk corner on my college campus. Onward!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

“I’m-On-Cloud-9″ Dreamy Vegan Mashed Potatoes
via Blissful Basil

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Photo via Ashley DeMillo.

Pairing potatoes with cashews and cauliflower, Ashley at Blissful Basil has created what appears as the most luscious iteration of mashed potatoes at which my mouth has ever watered. Plus, see if you can guess the secret ingredient…

Sweet

How to Make Coconut Oil Pie Crust
via Oh, Ladycakes

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Photo via Ashlae at Oh, Ladycakes.

Pie crust recipes generally tend to intimidate me a bit, but Ashlae’s accessible, clearly laid out directions for flaky pastry dough based in the most richly aromatic oil in all of Oil Land makes me want to jump right into the kitchen.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Tempeh Chili
adapted from The Post Punk Kitchen

Photo via Jugalbandi.

Photo via Jugalbandi.

This past week served as the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC)‘s big ol’ campus event week themed around government repression of animal rights and environmental activists (titled “The Terrorization of Dissent” after the recently released anthology by Lantern Books). For our first lecture of the week’s three-part series, editor of the anthology Jason Del Gandio gave an engaging and dynamic talk while the audience gobbled up spoonfuls of this, perhaps the most flavorful, heartiest, most pleasantly textured chili I’ve ever made. With vegan cookbook genius Isa Chandra Moskowitz behind the recipe, how could I have expected anything less?

Must-Read News Story

The Minstrelsy of Marketing
via William C. Anderson at Truthout

Photo via Denny's Twitter account.

Photo via Denny’s Twitter account.

An illuminating look into a pervasive intersection of capitalism and racism, this article by freelance writer William C. Anderson clearly demonstrates the default mode of U.S. society to commodify Blackness and Black bodies – a mode that certainly didn’t die out with the abolition of slavery.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

The FBI vs. Martin Luther King: Inside J. Edgar Hoover’s ‘Suicide Letter’ to Civil Rights Leader
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

On the topic of state repression of activists, the newly released full text of this horrifying letter from J. Edgar Hoover to Martin Luther King Jr. – in which the former assumes the identity of a Black activist urging Dr. King to kill himself – highlights the long history of the U.S. government to target social justice activists who pose threats to existing hierarchies of domination.

Book Recommendation

Project Intersect, Issue One: Clarion Call
edited by Jacqueline Morr

Photo via Project Intersect

Photo via Project Intersect

Encouraging “radical intersectional analyses of oppression that are sorely needed both in activist circles and in general public discourse,” the newly launched Project Intersect zine embodies exactly the direction toward which I hope with all my heart the future of the animal liberation movement points. I enthusiastically urge you to order your copy. Like, immediately.

In solidarity, Ali.

A Vegan Thanksgiving is Still Violent

In light of the Thanksgiving holiday and the recipe guides popping up with increasing frequency on food blogs, I’d like to share with ya’ll a call to take a different approach to Thanksgiving this year.

The Canada-based Native organization Idle No More, along with its branches in Minnesota, have teamed up with the Institute for Critical Animal Studies to ask animal advocacy groups to boycott, ban, and protest Thanksgiving instead of engaging in advocacy themed around this violent holiday. Rather, this coalition is calling for animal advocacy groups to “recognize it as a national day to mourn the genocide by white settlers of Native Americans and First Nation peoples.”

Though I could write in more detail about why Thanksgiving is based in the arrogant ethnocentrism of the settlers who uprooted Native peoples from their land and decimated them, all in the name of building the ever-imperial U.S. as we know it today, I feel that it is more appropriate for me – instead of accepting credit for already-existing information authored by those with historical and familial connections to Native genocide – to refer you to the in-depth, well-written articles that already exist.

Instead of hosting our usual vegan Thanksgiving dinner in the campus dining hall this year, the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC) is installing a poster just outside the hall explaining this call from Idle No More and ICAS, and why we have decided to participate in it. We take this action not to “feel good” about ourselves for being “good social justice activists,” but because a group on the front lines of Native struggle is asking groups like ours to take action.

Though I will be sharing a rather more involved and special meal with my loved ones on Thanksgiving day – celebrating not the “peaceful unification” of Native American peoples and white settlers (what bunk) but instead the love I feel for those around me, my appreciation for the harvest season,  and the fact that I have access to its bounty – I plan to do so while recognizing my own positionality as someone who can still easily perpetuate the violent erasure of Native peoples, and actively seeking ways to rail against this tendency. Some starting points for me may include enrolling in a Native Studies course at my college, advocating for my college to hire more Native Studies faculty, and researching the history of Native peoples specific to the geographic context in which I grew up.

Below I’ve copied the text from the Facebook group that includes the call from Idle No More and ICAS:

Calling Animal Advocacy Groups to Boycott, Ban and Protest Thanksgiving

NATIONAL ACTION

The Institute for Critical Animal Studies, Idle No More Duluth, Idle No More Twin Cities, #NotYourMascot, and other Native organizations (still confirming) are asking all animal advocacy groups to promote social justice this November by boycotting Thanksgiving Day (and any Thanksgiving related events) and recognizing it as a national day to morn a violent genocide by white settlers of Native Americans and First Nations People.

“Boycott” here means not holding public vegan Thanksgiving events and making a commitment not to celebrate Thanksgiving in one’s personal life as well. If you are like us, you believe that veganism is an ethical model for the world; let’s also lead the charge against an out-dated holiday with a make-believe history that covers up the true genocidal history of the U.S.

Turkey or Tofurkey, marshmallows or Dandies, traditional pumpkin pie or dairy-free pumpkin pie—you are still celebrating genocide … and that is *not* vegan.

There is no such thing as a vegan Thanksgiving. Don’t ignore one form of oppression to promote another. Veganism is nonviolence; genocide isn’t.
___________________________________________
Animal Advocacy Groups Boycotting Thanksgiving Events (not supporting genocide)

1. Institute for Critical Animal Studies
2. Progress for Science
3. Portland Animal Liberation
4. Student Animal Liberation Coalition
5. Resistance Ecology

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {11-7-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy Friday, and happy Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)! Midterm elections this week left me pretty bummed in terms of my home state after anti-unionist/abominable man Scott Walker beat out challenger/bike enthusiast Mary Burke by a mere six percentage points (On Wisconsin, amirite?). So, in the spirit of denial, today’s stories include no mention of the recent voting hubbub (though check out these couple of articles for potentially exciting measures that did find success this week). Instead, I’d like to share with you all my favorite roasting vegetable blanketed in a deeply flavored sauce, a silky and seasonal pie, crispy fritters of brussels sprout goodness, exciting intersectional projects and people advocating for animal liberation, evidence for why we shouldn’t deify large-scale human rights organizations, and a book that advocates for shaping our interactions with the world in a very different light. Onward!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Roasted Cauliflower in Mole-Inspired Sauce
via In Vegetables We Trust

Photo via Alexander Harvey.

Photo via Alexander Harvey.

Based in Mexican cuisine, mole sauce comes in innumerable variations depending on where you find yourself in Mexico; I’m told that every Mexican cook has their own unique recipe for the sauce. We in the U.S. typically encounter mole poblano – a many-ingredient mixture based in chilis and chocolate – and it seems that Alexander of In Vegetables We Trust has based his version of the dish on this particular variety of the sauce. Drawing from my recent musings on bloggers’ use of “ethnic” recipe titles, I appreciate Alexander’s decision to name his recipe “mole-inspired,” which to me indicates a humility that doesn’t assume responsibility for conceptualizing/perfecting/fully understanding the cultural complexities behind the dish…which I wish were happening in my kitchen right now.

Sweet

Pumpkin Creme Pie
via Cupcakes and Kale

Photo via Jess at Cupcakes and Kale.

Photo via Jess at Cupcakes and Kale.

The time of year for a barrage of pumpkin recipes has come, and I tend to pass over many of them out of a quickly induced boredom with the seemingly constant excitement over this poor, hyped-up squash. However, this pie from Jess at Cupcakes and Kale caught my eye due to its lighter, almost mousse-like variation on the standard pumpkin pie. To substitute unrefined sugar for the powdered sugar called for in the recipe, simply grind any unrefined granulated sugar (like coconut or date) in a food processor or blender along with a sprinkling of arrowroot powder or cornstarch.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Brussels Sprout Latkes
adapted from What’s Cooking Good Looking

Photo via Jodi at What's Cooking Good Looking.

Photo via Jodi at What’s Cooking Good Looking.

Two instances of sheer perfection: roasted brussels sprouts and crispy potatoes. What happens when these two manifestations of ideal phenomena merge? I can’t quite put it into words…so you’ll have to put it in your mouth.

To make these latkes vegan, I substituted the two eggs called for in the recipe with 2 tbsp flaxseed meal mixed with 6 tbsp water. Though I didn’t make the accompanying maple-mustard yogurt, you can easily veganize that by using non-dairy yogurt or blended silken tofu.

Must-Read News Story

‘Those Things We Cannot Unsee’: Interview with Jacqueline Morr of Project Intersect
via Justin Van Kleeck at Striving with Systems

Photo via Jacqueline Morr.

Photo via Jacqueline Morr.

People like Jacqueline Morr give me hope for the animal liberation movement, and for societal change more broadly. In this interview with fellow intersectional activist Justin Van Kleeck, Morr shares profound stories of her journey to veganism and anti-oppression work, uniting them in a manner that speaks of true transformative potential. If you’re enamored with Morr after reading this interview (and how could you not be?), be sure to email projectintersectzine@gmail.com to request your copy of Morr’s latest project: a newly launched intersectional vegan zine known as Project Intersect.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

‘The Red Cross’ Secret Disaster’: Charity Prioritized PR over People After Superstorm Sandy
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Since taking a Geography course last semester on the Political Geography of Human Rights, my readiness to accept the rhetoric of large-scale human rights organizations has steadily declined. The nitty gritty details of that class provide much too much fodder to discuss in this abbreviated format, but this supreme fuck-up – as revealed by ProPublica and reported on by Democracy Now! – by the American Red Cross speaks to the need to look upon mainstream human rights discourse with a critical eye.

Book Recommendation

Transformation Now!: Toward a Post-Oppositional Politics of Change
by AnaLouise Keating

Photo via University of Illinois Press.

Photo via University of Illinois Press.

In her book Transformation Now!, AnaLouise Keating deconstructs the oppositional framework in which society at large operates, and which conditions us to view the world in either/or, “my-idea-is-better-than-yours” terms, thus preventing us from finding common ground with the world around us; and without common ground, how can we hope to unite for transformative change? Keating advocates a practice of “intellectual humility,” in which we stray from boxing ourselves and others into our pre-existing notions of available identities for us to occupy, and instead allow ourselves to see others in a more flexible manner, independent of our assumptions about them. I know that these ideas can seem a bit abstract, and I’m certainly not doing the book a huge amount of justice here, but I’d highly recommend this book to introduce you to a new (and I believe necessary) manner of shaping one’s interactions with other beings.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {10-31-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich, white, or human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Helloooo and welcome to yet another edition of your weekly dose of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (# NewsandChews)First off, though, I want to thank you all for your thoughtful input on my most recent post on “ethnic” recipe titles as cultural appropriation (a relevant topic considering the holiday on which this post falls). In this case, I’d highly encourage you to read the comments — good stuff going on there! Anywho, today’s featured recipes include a vibrant salad of beautifully contrasting textures and two of my most beloved pieces of fall produce, as well as some of the most flavorful chickpeas I’ve ever cooked up. As for stories, I’m excited to highlight critiques of the oh-so problematic “Thug Kitchen” blog and cookbook, an episode of Citizen Radio that features three of my favorite progressive female podcasters, and a book that highlights the threats made by NGOs to feminist organizing in the Global South (India, in this specific case). Happy Halloween! Here’s a guide to vegan candy and how not to be culturally appropriative with your costume.

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Arugula, Fig, & Fried White Sweet Potato Salad
via A House in the Hills

Photo via Sarah Yates.

Photo via Sarah Yates.

Spicy arugula, succulent figs, crispy sweet potatoes…need I say more besides “get ready for a bounty of deceptively simple flavors”?

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Cool Ranch Roasted Chickpeas
via Vegan Yack Attack

Photo via Jackie Sobon.

Photo via Jackie Sobon.

Ya’ll, I cooked up a big ol’ batch of these for my nighttime seminar on Geography & Social Movements this Monday, and the entire class could not keep their hands off of them. Who knew that a little nooch and powdered garlic and onion could so enchant non-vegans and veg folks alike?

Must-Read News Story

Critiques of “Thug Kitchen” by Liz Ross, Ayinde Howell, A. Breeze Harper, and Bryant Terry

Photo via Thug Kitchen.

Photo via Thug Kitchen.

Thug Kitchen provides a striking example of the racism perpetuated by the visible mainstream vegan movement today, and I’m thrilled that folks within the movement have spoken out against it.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

U.S. media freaks out on behalf of Canadians, Shep Smith has a moment of clarity, and Mike Brown’s autopsy
via Citizen Radio

Photo via Citizen Radio.

Photo via Citizen Radio.

Allison Kilkenny of Citizen Radio, Molly Knefel of Radio Dispatch, and Katharine Heller of Tell the Bartender unite for a podcast of laughter and provoking political discussion. My three favorite female podcasters in one place? Too good to be true.

Book Recommendation

Playing with Fire: Feminist Thought and Activism through Seven Lives in India
by the Sangtin Writers Collective

Photo via University of Minnesota Press.

Photo via University of Minnesota Press.

Questioning the legitimization of “expert” knowledge production versus that of local feminist activists in the Uttar Pradash province of India, the Sangtin writers collective employ deeply personal diary entries to investigate larger themes of sexism, casteism, communalism, and NGO-ization. An utterly important feminist-of-color text indicative of the building of transformative social movements.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {9-12-14}

If you haven’t already, please be sure to enter my latest giveaway for my new favorite vegan ice cream from the admirable, socially conscious company Three Little Birds!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

On this pre-birthday edition of Vegan Chews & Progressive News (#NewsandChews) – can you say 20 years old on September 14, woot woot! – we’ve got the crispiest of potatoes, the most spectacular of cruciferi, an essential feminist critique of the animal rights movement, the practice of calling each other in, a pivotal court ruling in the battle against climate change, and what I consider one of the most important books in the world of veganism and animal rights to date. Allez-y!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Best-Ever Breakfast Potatoes
via Minimalist Baker

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

Photo via Minimalist Baker.

We eat a pretty hefty amount of potatoes in my on-campus 21-person vegan living cooperative (one of my housemates recently testified to eating at least 11 potatoes on a weekly basis), due to their price accessibility, nutritional value, and downright comforting tastiness. Though we enjoy a variety of potato-based dishes in our house dinners (salads, soups, mashes, etc.), we’ve all but officially voted on roasted potatoes as our preferred tuber preparation. Each time a housemate offers up roasted potatoes for a communal dinner, they enter an informal contest judging who can produce the crispiest potatoes. With this recipe from Dana at Minimalist Baker, I feel pretty confident in my abilities to trump the competition.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Cauliflower Steaks with Mushroom Gravy
adapted from Olives for Dinner

cauliflower steak with mushroom gravy

Though my good friend Kaden may resent me for saying so, I’ve come to the conclusion that cauliflower far surpasses broccoli in the battle for the title of Best Floret-Based Cruciferous Vegetable. While cauliflower’s versatility (creamy soups and sauces! raw and dipped in hummus! hidden in baked goods!) certainly plays a role in this thoroughly contemplated judgment, I believe that the superiority of cauliflower lies mainly in its roasting capabilities (can you tell that I’m really into roasting vegetables? Potatoes, cauliflower…you name it, I’ll roast it). In fact, in my humble opinion, cauliflower resides on the pedestal of Best Roasting Vegetables, along with brussels sprouts and squash (cauliflower holds a lot of titles, in my book). So when a recipe tells me to roast thick slices of cauliflower in sage leaves to yield hearty, tender bites with crispy edges and douse them in a mushroom-based gravy, how can I refuse?

Must-Read News Story

For the Animals, By the People…Not the Man: A Vegan Feminist Critique of Social Movement Hierarchy
by Corey Lee Wrenn at The Academic Abolitionist Vegan

Photo via TAVS.

Photo via TAVS.

Last summer, as an intern for Compassion Over Killing, I attended the 2013 national Animal Rights Conference in Alexandria, VA. As a main attraction, the event highlighted a debate on the most effective form of animal advocacy – welfarism or abolitionism – between Farm Sanctuary’s Bruce Friedrich (advocating for welfarism) and Gary Francione (the figurehead of the “abolitionist approach” to animal rights). In speaking to conference attendees, I found that many folks thought ill of this movement “in-fighting,” espousing a sentiment along the lines of, “why can’t we all just get along?” This sentiment in part inspired my recent blog post on the need for animal activists to critically engage with problematic practices of our movement, and I’m thrilled that the ever-insightful Corey Lee Wrenn has penned a clear and concise post informed by similar concerns. Not only does Corey Lee affirm that “factionalism is both normal and healthy for social movements, and is something to be expected,” she also does not shy away from speaking out against forms of human oppression within the animal rights movement; in this particular post, “a patriarchal social structure of command within our organizations.” I highly recommend that you subscribe to Corey Lee’s mailing list on her blog immediately.

Calling IN: A Less Disposable Way of Holding Each Other Accountable
via Ngoc Loan Tran at Black Girl Dangerous

Image via Black Girl Dangerous.

Image via Black Girl Dangerous.

In response to my aforementioned recent post on “The Importance of Calling Each Other Out,” fellow progressive vegan blogger Raechel of Rebel Grrl Living shared with me this post from the truly important blog Black Girl Dangerous (another one to which you must subscribe in the next twelve seconds). The piece advocates for social justice activists to cultivate a practice of calling in along with calling out, the distinction resting in a sense of compassion behind our reason for speaking to someone about an action of theirs we consider problematic. Author Ngoc Loan Tran explains in hopeful, profound terms what they see as the value behind calling in: “Because when I see problematic behavior from someone who is connected to me, who is committed to some of the things I am, I want to believe that it’s possible for us to move through and beyond whatever mistake was committed.” I’m definitely going to actively try to start practicing this more caring form of critical engagement. Thank you, Raechel, for sharing the post with me!

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Exclusive: DA Joins the Climate Activists He Declined to Prosecute, Citing Danger of Global Warming
via Democracy Now!

Untitled

Photo via Democracy Now!.

In a hopefully precedent-setting court ruling, Massachusetts’ Bristol County District Attorney Sam Sutter dropped criminal charges on two climate activists who blocked the shipment of 40,000 tons of coal to a local power plant with their lobster boat (of course, I find it rather ironic that two environmental activists employed a boat engaged in an industry tied to the wholesale destruction of our oceans…but that’s a topic for another post). Not only did Sutter take the very real and urgent concern of climate change into account when carrying out this ruling, he also plans to march with the two previously arrested activists – Ken Ward, Jr. and Jay O’Hara – in the upcoming People’s Climate March in New York City. I wholeheartedly appreciate Sutter’s consideration of social context in his ruling, rather than attempting to rule “objectively” as the judicial system strives to do (an impossible goal considering the fact that everyone – even supposedly objective actors like lawyers, judges, and scientists – carry personal prejudices, preferences, and subjective experiences with them).

I do, however, want to point out the whiteness of both of the activists as well as Sutter. Considering the U.S. criminal justice system’s disproportionate targeting of people of color, I can’t help but wondering whether the activists would have enjoyed dropped charges if they were not white. Additionally, I’d like to point out that the environmental movement and the media tend to highlight the activism of white folks despite the significant contributions that people of color have made to the struggle for the well-being of the planet, and this story – though indicative of an important social shift – plays into that tendency. Just as with the animal rights movement, we have to work to make the environmental movement a more inclusive one.

Book Recommendation

Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health, and Society
edited by A. Breeze Harper

sv_book

An anthology of perspectives on veganism from Black females, Sistah Vegan constitutes a phenomenally important work in that it gives voice to a group habitually silenced both within the animal rights movement and in a broader societal context. Combating the mainstream vegan culture dominated by wealthy white folks and that focuses on the proliferation of expensive novelty foods and capitalist-driven consumer choices, this anthology highlights the marginalized views of women of color who see veganism as a practice of holistic health and anti-colonialism. Thanks to the incredible work of A. Breeze Harper, Sistah Vegan has expanded from a book into a larger project, the details of which you can find at The Sistah Vegan Project. There, you can also read Harper’s introduction to the anthology, and I sincerely hope that you do.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {9-5-14}

In case you missed the edit to Monday’s post, please hop on over to the top of my “Saffron Cantaloupe Butter | The Importance of Calling Each Other Out” post and check out a very important retraction. Thank you!

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the well-being of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy Friday and welcome to your weekly dose of Vegan Chews and Progressive News (#NewsandChews)Today’s recipes feature an original take on the classic kale chip, a delectable interpretation of a quintessential flavor pairing, and a vegan taco bar for a crowd. Turning to news, we’re looking at an enlightening perspective on women’s lack of advancement in the workplace, Hong Kong’s powerful Occupy Central movement, and a book that explores a myriad of problems within the U.S. food system through investigative journalism. Let’s get to it!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory

Baked Pesto Kale Chips
via Sweet Simple Vegan

Photo via Sweet Simple Vegan.

Photo via Sweet Simple Vegan.

I’ve crafted many a crispy leaf of smoky kale in my time, from rich savory treats coated in cheesy cashew sauce to simply roasted greens coated in coconut oil and smoked paprika. I’ve even coated to-roast kale in hummus, but never before encountering this recipe had I contemplated the same use for pesto. Bound to yield deeply yet brightly flavored kale chip fabulousness, this recipe will certainly enter my repertoire in the very near future.

Sweet

Peanut Butter & Jelly Cookie Bars
via The Honour System

Photo via The Honour System.

Photo via The Honour System.

In my 21-person vegan living cooperative, we devour our fair share of chickpea-based desserts, thanks to our monthly supply of 25-pound sacks of dried chickpeas. Similarly, I’m fairly certain that we consume up to 41% of New York state’s peanut butter supply. This 8-ingredient treat, therefore, proves more than well-suited for the Ferry Haus kitchen and bellies, once again marrying those three letters made for each other: PB & J.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Ferry Taco Bar with Roasted Chickpeas, Dirty Rice, Crispy Cabbage Slaw, & Salsa
Original Recipe

tacos

Speaking of Ferry Haus, last week I packed up my Brooklyn apartment and completed the short journey to my on-campus cooperative in Poughkeepsie, where this Tuesday I began classes as a junior Geography major at Vassar College. With 21 creative minds – both culinary and otherwise – to fill the kitchen, our nightly communal dinners never fail to wow, surprise, and disappear within minutes. Inspired by the corn tortillas that turned up in our refrigerator, I felt compelled to prepare a summery taco bar for the Haus, complete with smoked paprika-roasted chickpeas, tomato-laden dirty rice with plenty of spices (cumin, oregano, cilantro, Spanish paprika, cayenne), a bright and crunchy cabbage-carrot slaw for contrast, and a canned tomato classic-style salsa with onions, garlic, and jalapeno. Who can argue with veggies, grains, and legumes rolled up in a soft tortilla? Almost as good as a sandwich. ;)

Must-Read News Article

Why Aren’t Women Advancing at Work? Ask a Transgender Person.
via Jessica Nordell at New Republic

Photo via New Republic.

Photo via New Republic.

This eye-opening article from New Republic explores the fact that women advance in the workplace at a much lower rate than men, specifically the notion that this happens because of personal choices or cognitive and emotional characteristics, whether innate or socialized. Through interviews with individuals of trans experience who have remained in the same careers/jobs after their transitions, author Jessica Nordell reveals that individuals experience starkly different treatment in the workplace depending on their gender, even though they’re essentially the exact same person.

To take an example from the article, when a man named Ben still presented as a woman and solved a difficult math problem, his biology professor insisted that “Your boyfriend must have solved it.” However, after Ben’s transition, that same professor – unaware of Ben’s transition – commended his work, commenting that Ben’s work was “so much better than his sister’s.”

A fascinating article that sheds light upon the clear anti-woman bias that still exists in our society of supposed gender equality.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Hong Kong ‘Occupy Central’ Protests Call for Political Freedom After China Rejects Open Elections
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

In Hong Kong, an outpouring of protestors have united under the name of Occupy Central to oppose the Chinese government’s rejection of demands for Hong Kong to freely choose its next leader in 2017. The oldest global faction in the Occupy movement, Occupy Central has proven its determination through huge numbers of protestors and international recognition, and is currently threatening to blockade the city’s central business district.

I don’t highlight this story to bash the Chinese government, for I don’t feel that it’s my place to do so as a Westerner whose government has its fair share of problems with its democratic leadership. Instead, I seek to act in solidarity with the protestors, who have publicly requested that individuals in the Western world spread the word of their struggle. Additionally, I hope that seeing these powerful protests against an oppressive government will inspire U.S. actors to more actively speak out against our less obviously exploitative system of rule, especially in regards to its regards to its treatment of already marginalized peoples.

Book Recommendation

The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields, and the Dinner Table
by Tracie McMillan

Photo via American Way of Eating blog.

Photo via American Way of Eating blog.

In this acclaimed book uncovering a myriad of problems existing within the U.S. food system, award-winning and working-class journalist Tracie McMillan worked undercover in three jobs that feed America, living off of her wages in each. Reporting from California onion and grape fields, the produce aisle of a Walmart just outside of Detroit, and the kitchen of a NYC Applebee’s, McMillan investigates how most folks living in the U.S. eat, while a much smaller group happily spends $9 on organic heirloom tomatoes (guilty as charged). Most insightfully, McMillan explains the national policies (especially their racist dimensions) that lay the groundwork for this “American way of eating.” Though McMillan does not explore the problems within the U.S.’ system of animal agriculture, I think that it proves especially important for vegans to educate ourselves about the non-animal-related issues surrounding our nation’s food, so as not to ignore the plight of farm workers and other individuals exploited in various forms of food service.

In solidarity, Ali.

Cashew Cheese-Stuffed Fried Squash Blossoms | Restaurant (Review) Closing

Before launching into today’s post and recipe, I’d like to congratulate Melissa Kallick, the winner of my giveaway for a pack of savory, vegan, gluten-free snack bars from Slow Food for Fast Lives!

Back in mid-June, shortly after I had set myself up in Brooklyn for the summer, I published a review of a restaurant in my new neighborhood and promised many more over the course of the next three months. However, on the next occasion I sat down to type up a Brooklyn restaurant review, I stopped myself mid-paragraph and questioned, “Do I really want to post this review on my blog?”

fried squash blossoms (1)

Why, after offering my take on dozens of vegan-friendly eateries around the world, did I suddenly decide not to do so? I don’t feel comfortable publishing restaurant reviews anymore. Dining at fabulous eateries on a regular basis (or at all) constitutes an enormous privilege afforded to me by my family’s well-off background and my social standing as a non-marginalized individual.

Indeed, if one considers that, after paying rent and taxes, someone who works full-time on the minimum wage enjoys only $77 per week to spend on food and transportation, a single dinner at an average restaurant in New York City would eat up (oh, puns!) about a third of the money that someone has to spend over the course of seven days (i.e., 20 more meals). I imagine that anyone who has experienced this skimpy weekly budget – 3.3 million workers, or 4.3 percent of all hourly paid workers – would not only feel completely unable to identify with me as a person, but would also feel rather offended that I was essentially rubbing in their face the class gap that allowed me to eat at a high-quality restaurant at least once a week while their food choices remained severely constrained.

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As someone who advocates veganism – a lifestyle often associated today with upper-middle-class white folks, and thereby regarded as classist – I seek not to perpetuate the frequently true stereotype of vegans as people focused solely on staying up-to-date on the latest animal-free food trends, waxing poetic about expensive specialty products, and acting in other ways that obscure the heart of veganism: saying no, wherever possible in the contemporary world, to consuming products that rely on animal exploitation (meat, dairy, eggs, honey, fur, leather, silk, animal-tested cosmetics, etc.). While I understand the importance of sharing with not-yet-vegans the wide variety of familiar, veganized foods – both packaged and in restaurants – that make many individual’s transition easier, I feel that relying on these aspects of one form of the vegan lifestyle contributes to the capitalist system that both oppresses marginalized groups everywhere and fuels the animal agriculture industry.

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Veganism is about so much more than the food we eat, no matter how ridiculously delicious it can be, and centering our (and thereby the general public’s) attention on the food to which we have ready access contributes to the perception of a vegan diet as viable only for the most privileged groups of people. I certainly don’t mean to say that we shouldn’t continue to share vegan food with others – I write a blog with plenty of recipes, for goodness sake – but that we should be careful to not present vegan specialty products and restaurant food as the only important aspects of a vegan lifestyle.

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Of course, in addition to this shift in attention, we should support measures to get nourishing food into communities damaged by systemic inequalities, such as community garden initiatives, efforts to minimize food waste, and the programs of such groups as the Food Empowerment Project. Lack of access to healthy food options is also intimately connected to structural racism against which we must unite, though these efforts prove much more complicated and multifaceted. Check out my Resources section to learn more about structural racism and how we might combat it.

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Obviously, my choice to no longer publish restaurant reviews on my blog will not fix the lack of access to nourishing food in low-income communities, nor does it mean that I’ve ceased to play into the classist rhetoric of the current vegan movement. However, I feel that it will comprise a small, semi-symbolic/semi-material step on the path to a less classist vegan movement. If you’re interested in vegan restaurant recommendations in a particular city, check out my Travel section or shoot me a message using my Contact form.

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And anyhow, why take up blog space writing about food I didn’t even make, especially when I and anyone with a bit of practice have the ability to create just as tasty fare? Indeed, it doesn’t take a culinary genius to blend up some cashews into creamy bliss, stuff it inside the flowers that grow on the end of summer’s bounty of zucchini, and fry it all intro crispy morsels of summery yumminess. This recipe represents Italian peasant food at its best – a reminder that the origins of plant-based food lay not with cost-prohibitive items, but with unpretentious produce-centric dishes. Pff, who needs restaurant reviews?

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Cashew Cheese-Stuffed Fried Squash Blossoms

Makes 15-20 blossoms.

Ingredients:

1 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours (preferably overnight), drained, and rinsed
1 tbsp sweet white miso
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (about 1 lemons’ worth)
1/2 tsp maple syrup
Pinch of salt
1/4 cup tightly packed fresh tarragon leaves

15-20 fresh squash blossoms, gently rinsed
1/2 cup arrowroot powder or cornstarch
Coconut or vegetable oil for frying

In the bowl of a food processor or the carafe of a high-speed blender, combine all of the cashew cheese ingredients except the tarragon (cashews through salt). Process/blend until very smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl/carafe as necessary to get everything blending nicely. Once the mixture is smooth, pulse in the tarragon so that it flecks the cheese, rather than turns it green.

Spoon a tablespoon or so into the hollow middle of each blossom, handling the delicate blossoms carefully so as not to tear them. As you stuff the blossoms, lay each one on a large plate.

Place the arrowroot or cornstarch in a medium-sized bowl. Lightly coat each stuffed blossom in the starch, tapping the blossom against the side of the bowl to knock off any excess starch. Lay back on the plate.

Heat over high heat enough oil to cover the bottom of a large-ish skillet with about a 1/2-inch of oil. While the oil heats, place two layers of paper towel on another large plate. Once the oil is very hot and starts crackling (350°F), place half of the stuffed and coated blossoms in the oil. Fry for 2-4 minutes on each side, or until both sides are golden brown, using a tongs to turn the blossoms over. Once the blossoms have finished frying, turn off the heat and carefully transfer them with the tongs to the paper towel-lined plate. Place the skillet back over the heat, and add more oil as needed to bring the level back up to about a 1/2-inch of oil. Fry the remaining half of the blossoms, placing them on the paper towel-lined plate when they’ve finished frying. Serve immediately.

Recipe submitted to Virtual Vegan Linky Potluck.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-15-14}

Before launching into today’s post, I’d like to point you toward the giveaway I’m currently running for a free pack of savory, vegan, gluten-free snack bars from Slow Food for Fast Lives, as well as toward my recent review of the eBook series entitled “Socialists and Animal Rights” on Our Hen House

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Welcome to the 11th installment of Vegan Chews and Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! This one’s recipes feature two items of summer produce that I hold near and dear to my heart, as well as the non-dairy cheese that occupies an equally cherished place…in my stomach. As for news, we’ve got gender norms, the denial of racism, non-military solutions to the situation in Iraq, corporate efforts to privatize education, and the government’s labeling of activists as terrorists. Fun stuff today, folks!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
via Veggie Belly
Photo via Veggie Belly.

Photo via Veggie Belly.

 When summer rolls around, one vegetable that I can’t seem to put into my mouth fast enough is sweet corn. Growing up the in Midwest, I devoured the juicy corn-on-the-cob my mother would boil every week during the warm months, smearing corn bits all over my adolescent face. Naturally, I’ve held the majestic sweet corn dear into adulthood, now chopping it into salads, roasting it in the husk, and pureeing it into soups, but always appreciating its familiarity as a childhood family favorite. This recipe for Masala-Coated Corn, however, introduces a completely new application for my longtime summer veggie pal, coating it in a succulent Indian-spiced tomato sauce. Yes. Yes, please.
Sweet
via My Whole Food Life
Blueberry-Bliss-Bars-My-Whole-Food-Life

I don’t know how the folks at the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket grow their blueberries, but whatever they’re doing comprises the work of a genius. I honestly cannot remember ever experiencing plumper, sweeter, and more flavorful blueberries than during my time in Brooklyn this summer. With a mere four ingredients –one of which is the true delicacy of coconut cream –the fudgy bars pictured above would surely showcase the perfection of my Brooklyn blueberries (how’s that for alliteration?).

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Broccoli Quesadilla with Avocado, Garlic, and Dill
Adapted from Mountain Mama Cooks

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During my daily perusing of the latest recipes published in the foodie blogosphere, I tend to bypass those that contain animal flesh and secretions rather than seeking to veganize them. With such a plethora of creative, masterful vegan recipes out there that replicate and far exceed the non-vegan online fare, I see no reason to bookmark the recipes that imply animal exploitation. There exist exceptions to every rule, however, and this verdant quesadilla recipe represents one such exception. Boasting a saute of crisp-tender broccoli and sharp garlic contrasted with the refreshing smoothness of avocado and the slightly sweet note of one of my favorite herbs, the original quesadilla recipe required only a substitute of the king of all non-dairy cheeses on the market (aka, Daiya shredsto provide a veggie-loaded and ooey-gooey vegan entree.

Must-Read News Article

Today I’d like to highlight a pair of articles that touch upon two forms of hegemonic oppression that profoundly affect all of us, though about which most of us remain either unconscious or in denial: gender conformity and white supremacy.

Forcing Kids to Stick to Gender Roles Can Actually Be Harmful to Their Health
by Tara Culp-Ressler at Think Progress

Photo via Shutterstock.

Photo via Shutterstock.

It should come as no surprise that forcing children to conform to an identity with which they don’t actually, well, identify would cause them severe stress and mental anxiety. Indeed, a recent study has confirmed just this intuition, suggesting that the pervasive societal assumption of gender as biological (aka, “natural”) leads to insecurity and low self-esteem in children, who feel the need to exert constant effort to perform in line with established gender norms. Unlike many articles concerning entrenched social issues, though, this one concludes on a hopeful bent, noting that young folks are far less indoctrinated into society’s notions of gender than are older individuals.

We’re Not a Post-Racial Society: We’re an Innocent-Until-Proven-Racist Society
by Danielle Henderson at AlterNet

Photo via AlterNet.

Photo via AlterNet.

Turning to a second hegemony of white supremacy, this article points out with specific examples the general resistance to labeling clearly racist incidents as “racist” (kind of like how only recently did the New York Times promise to start calling torture “torture”). The author astutely attributes this problematic phenomenon to the the promotion in the 1990s of colorblindness, which encouraged whites to pretend not to “see” race, and therefore to deny the existence of racism while at the same time perpetuating it (in the words of Desmond Tutu, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor”). Indeed, if we pretend that racism does not exist, we can not as white folks start to cultivate the anti-racist consciousness necessary in fostering a just society for all.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Two multimedia segments for you today, as well! One on the U.S. intervention in Iraq, the other on the corporatization of the educational system.

As U.S. Airstrikes in Iraq Begin, Will Military Intervention Escalate Growing Crisis?
via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

Photo via Democracy Now!

On last Friday’s episode of Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez spoke with Phyllis Bennis, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies who has written extensively on Middle East-U.S. relations and actively opposes the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Recently, Bennis published an insightful piece entitled “Don’t Go Back to Iraq!: Five Steps the U.S. Can Take in Iraq without Going Back to War.” Emphasizing an end to military “solutions” and a collaboration with other nations, Bennis’ piece counters the U.S.’ patriarchal discourse of war as the answer to all of our problems. Bennis discusses the details of her piece and more on this episode of Democracy Now!.

Debunking Ed Reform
via Radio Dispatch

Photo via The Colbert Report.

Photo via The Colbert Report.

Moving to another war – this time the war on public education by conservative self-titled “ed reformers” – John and Molly of Radio Dispatch debunk in detail claims that we must abolish teacher tenure in an effort to improve the performance of schoolchildren. John and Molly explain that standardized testing does not necessarily adequately reflect a student’s capabilities, and that the low-income students performing the worst based upon this standardized testing is largely the result of their poverty, not their teacher’s presumed incompetence. For more on this important discussion, watch the Colbert Report episode with ed reform advocate Campbell Brown that John and Molly reference on the show, as well as a Washington Post article entitled “Fact-Checking Campbell Brown: What She Said, What Research Really Shows.”

Book Recommendation

The Terrorization of Dissent: Corporate Repression, Legal Corruption, and the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act
by Jason del Gandio and Anthony J. Nocella II

Photo via Amazon.com.

Photo via Amazon.com.

I’ll finish today by recommending a book that brings together the government repression of activists (particularly animal and environmental), the privileging of corporate interests, and the shoddy U.S. legal system. Edited by powerful intersectional activists and scholars Jason del Gandio and Anthony J. Nocella II, this anthology contains important essays by intellectuals and prosecuted activists alike that concern the government’s labeling of animal and environmental activists as terrorists (even though these groups have never caused bodily harm to anyone, while white supremacist hate groups run free), the free speech-chilling Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) of 2006, and recent “ag-gag” laws. This November, the Vassar Animal Rights Coalition (VARC) (for which I’m honored and humbled to serve a second year as co-president) plans on hosting a campus event week focusing on the topics explored in this book, featuring three of the anthology’s contributors and finishing on Saturday with a discussion that includes numerous activist groups on campus. An important topic for activists of all stripes to explore.

In solidarity, Ali.

Slow Food for Fast Lives Bars Review & GIVEAWAY!

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

I know, I know – the amount of Farmers Market Vegan giveaways this summer has gotten a wee bit out of hand. Somehow, though, I feel that you, dear readers, don’t really mind all of these chances to win free, high-quality vegan products…so what the hey? Howsabout a fifth summer giveaway here on FMV?

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Today I’d like to introduce you to a truly unique line of products from the on-the-go, health-conscious folks over at Slow Food for Fast Lives. Finding themselves with hectic schedules that made sitting down regularly for a nourishing meal quite difficult, the company’s founders – Danny, Mel, and Patricia – combined their appreciation of good food with their desire to provide healthy options for individuals with bustling agendas. With Danny’s innovative idea of launching the market’s first savory snack bar and Mel’s entrepreneurial skills behind her, Patricia employed her imaginative cooking skills in combining farmers’ market produce with nuts, spices, and unrefined sweeteners to create a line of vegetable-based bars in a variety of globally inspired flavors. Not only did these bars far surpass a taste test, they also each contained 1-1.5 servings of veggies and ample amounts of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, calcium, and iron.

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Since Patricia emerged from her kitchen with that first batch of sumptuous home-cooked bars, Slow Food for Fast Lives has shared its breakthrough products with retailers in California and the Southwest, as well as online, in the hopes of helping busy folks across the U.S. to “eat present, not tense.” While the company’s line currently features four bars – California, Indian, Moroccan, and Thai – the founders constantly have their culinary thinking caps on, perfecting such future flavors as Italian, Japanese, and Mexican. They also eagerly welcome suggestions from consumers on what slow food flavors they’d like to enjoy in their fast lives at info@eattruefoods.com.

While all of Slow Food for Fast Live’s bars are gluten-free and kosher, the California bar does contain honey; the rest of the three are completely vegan! (Check out why I don’t advocate the consumption of honey here.) As such, in this post I’ll only be reviewing the Indian, Moroccan, and Thai flavors.

SFFFL collage 1

I first journeyed into the world of Slow Food for Fast Lives with the Moroccan bar: a vibrantly hued blend of crunchy pistachios, chewy currants, sweet carrots, protein-rich lentils, attractive black sesame seeds, and smooth tahini spiced up with lemon, garlic, ginger, turmeric, and cumin. Featuring hearty chunks of each ingredient instead of constituting a homogeneously blended bar, the Moroccan bar offered a multiplicity of interesting textures mingling with bold flavors. Of the three bars I sampled, I might just prefer the Moroccan bar the most.

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The Thai bar made the next appearance in my Slow Food for Fast Lives tasting tour. Boasting a double whammy of peanuts and peanut butter, crispy brown rice, succulent red bell peppers, and zippy green onions in a bright and spicy mix of lime juice, dried basil, garlic and onion powders, and chiles, the Thai bar definitely got the spice sensors on my tongue all a-tingling. Though I didn’t expect such a pleasant piquant-ness in my snack bar, I found gastronomic memory harkening back to my favorite Thai restaurant in my hometown of Madison, WI after biting into this bar.

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My snack bar trip around the globe ended with the Indian bar – a close second favorite behind the Moroccan bar. Reminding me of a samosa dipped in mango sauce or a coconut curry (but in snack bar form), the Indian bar made supremely savory use of rich cashews and coconut, cauliflower, lentils, hearty potatoes, sweet peas, and buttery mangoes accentuated with tomato powder, turmeric, onion, chili pepper, ginger, and cumin. Redolent with the flavors of curry without being overwhelming, this smooth, chewy bar proves warming and satisfying.

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Have I engaged in enough culinary wordplay to persuade you all to incorporate some slow food into your fast lives? Well, lucky for one of you, the folks at Slow Food for Fast Lives have generously offered to gift a pack of their nourishing, tasty, and inventive bars to a Farmers Market Vegan reader. Simply click on one of the links at the top and bottom of this post, follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter giveaway, and get those fingers crossed. Also be sure to connect with Slow Food for Fast Lives on Facebook and Twitter!

This giveaway will end at 11:59 pm on Sunday, August 17, and I will announce the winner on the following day.

Sorry, this giveaway has closed!

I was not paid to run this giveaway, though I was provided with free product samples. All opinions are completely my own.

In solidarity, Ali.

Vegan Chews & Progressive News {8-8-14}

Farmers Market Vegan’s “Vegan Chews & Progressive News” series strives to promote artful vegan food and progressive discussion of social issues—both of which prove necessary in fostering a society that prioritizes the wellbeing of all creatures (not just the rich or the human) over the continuous striving for profit/resource accumulation.

Happy 10th anniversary of Vegan Chews and Progressive News (#NewsandChews)! Exciting, no? Throw some aluminum foil at me! Right? 10th anniversary is aluminum? Anyway… Your jaw will hang wide open at the lavender-spiked grilled cheese sandwich, the creamy green dessert, and the simple yet complexly flavored side dish featured on today’s post. Then, you’ll get your Friday fix of feminism, anti-racism, anti-militarism, and current events. Let’s dive in!

Favorite Newly Published Recipe

Savory
Photo via Keepin' it Kind.

Photo via Keepin’ it Kind.

Okay, so this sandwich isn’t necessarily a savory recipe, but that fact certainly does not detract from its ability to make my mouth water after one glimpse of its photo. A huge fan of toasted sandwiches and creamy nut cheeses, this recipe combines two of my gastronomic propensities with my flower of choice: lavender. My past housemate and I share an obsession of sorts with the scent and taste of lavender, though his passion proves so intense that I could smell him walking down the hallway even if the door to my room was closed. Gabe, I would share this sandwich first with you. Though blackberries don’t seem to be in season right now (at least not in Brooklyn), I’m certain that this sandwich would taste just as lovely with raspberries or blueberries.
Sweet
Ethereal Pistachio Mousse
via Clean Wellness
Photo via Clean Wellness.

Photo via Clean Wellness.

I’ve found myself on a rather unstoppable ice cream kick this summer and, judging by my excitement for this recipe, this kick apparently extends to all desserts of the creamy, dreamy, smooth, decadent, delicious, oh my goodness gracious I love ice cream….ahem, persuasion. Anywho, this dessert combines the impeccable texture of creamy desserts with a little green nut that holds a special place in my heart, reminding me of the pistachio gelato over which I swoon whenever I’m lucky enough to return to Italy.

Best Recipe I Made This Week

Roasted Scallions, Okra, and Green Beans with Za’atar and Olives
Adapted from Gourmandelle

za'atar veggies with olives

A simple recipe, yet one with enormous flavor. After discovering sumac at the Brooklyn Whole Foods – for which I had been on a quest since last December – I eagerly compiled all of the recipes on my “Recipes to Try” document that featured the brightly flavored seasoning, ubiquitous in Middle Eastern cuisine, known as za’atar (of which sumac is an integral ingredient). The first za’atar-y recipe with which I experimented, this multidimensional side dish pairs the fresh lemon-thyminess of za’atar (homemade with this recipewith the charred succulence of roasted scallions. Since the green beans and okra at my Brooklyn farmers’ market are at peak season right now, I threw a handful of each veggie in with the scallions, yielding fabulous results.

Must-Read News Article

The Problem with Men Explaining Things
by Rebecca Solnit at Mother Jones

Photo via Hypestock/Shutterstock.

Photo via Hypestock/Shutterstock.

I’ve long found myself feeling unimportant, questioning my intelligence and worth, during conversations with many of the men in my life, including those about whom I care very deeply. Feminist scholars like Rebecca Solnit (author of Men Explain Things to Me, which I’d highly recommend) have helped me to realize, name, and understand the origins of this feeling of disenfranchisement that I’ve experienced since childhood when interacting with most men. These feelings arise when, after nearly every mild assertion I make, the man with whom I’m speaking questions it, corrects it, or otherwise explains the correctness of a contrary point. An exhausting feeling to host on a daily basis, I’ve definitely internalized a sense of inferiority when in speaking situations with a male presence. This article by Rebecca Solnit at Mother Jones does a fantastic job of demonstrating the male tendency to explain things (EVERYTHING) to women, and has helped me to start combating that sense of inferiority.

Favorite Podcast Episode or Video

Brennan lies, NYPD misdemeanor arrests are up” and “We tortured some folks
via The Radio Dispatch

John & Molly, hosts. (Photo via The Radio Dispatch.)

John & Molly, hosts. (Photo via The Radio Dispatch.)

John and Molly Knefel, the hosts of The Radio Dispatch podcast, have produced especially tremendous episodes all this week, discussing in an accessible, thoughtful, and entertaining manner the urgent social issues of the moment, such as CIA Director John Brennan lies about his group’s spying on the Senate Intelligence Committee, the perpetual fucked-up-ness of the NYPD, the casual nature of Obama’s admission that the U.S. “tortured some folks,” and, of course, Gaza. These are the podcast episodes in which to immerse yourself on your next run, cooking bout, or evening unwinding time.

Book Recommendation

We Have Not Been Moved: Resisting Racism and Militarism in 21st Century America
Edited by Elizabeth “Betita” Martínez, Mandy Carter, and Matt Meyer

Photo via Amazon.

Photo via Amazon.

This summer, I’ve found myself devouring all the literature on social organizing and feminist/anti-racist/anti-capitalist theory that I can possibly consume. As a burgeoning activist, I see the immense importance of understanding the histories of the movements and issues to which I want to commit myself, as well as their contemporary state and significance. This anthology of essays by prominent anti-racist and anti-war activists writing at various points in the 21st century has greatly contributed to just such an understanding, featuring pieces by late revolutionary organizers and activists at the forefront of today’s struggles alike. An important book for engaging in the important work of linking racism, militarism, and other forms of oppression.

In solidarity, Ali.